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Micah Johnson, who authorities have identified as the shooter who killed five law enforcement officers in Dallas on July 7 during a protest over recent fatal police shootings of black men. AP hide caption

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AP

Ameera, 6, walks with assistance at the Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. She is recovering from a gunshot wound sustained when she was caught in a firefight between U.S. and Afghan soldiers and Taliban insurgents. Senior Airman Robert Dantzler/U.S. Air Force hide caption

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Senior Airman Robert Dantzler/U.S. Air Force

Ameera, A 6-Year-Old Afghan, Prepares To Walk Out Of U.S. Military Hospital

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An Afghan protester screams near the scene of a suicide attack that targeted crowds of minority Shiite Hazaras during a demonstration in Kabul on Saturday. Wakil Kohsar /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar /AFP/Getty Images

An Afghan soldier stands at a mortar training range near Kandahar, Afghanistan. The Afghan forces are still receiving help from the U.S. as they battle the Taliban. This photo was taken by NPR's David Gilkey shortly before he was killed by the Taliban on June 5. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Afghanistan: A Tragic Return To A War With No End

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Afghan police inspect the site in in Kabul, Afghanistan, where a bus convoy was attacked on Thursday. The buses carrying police cadets were targeted as they were on their way from the neighboring Maidan Wardak province to Kabul. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

The Gray Team with Maj. Jennifer Bell (center), who ran a concussion clinic, seen in the Helmand province of Afghanistan in 2010: Col. Michael Jaffee (from left) , Capt. James Hancock, Col. Geoffrey Ling, Lt. Col. Shean Phelps and Col. Robert Saum. Courtesy of Christian Macedonia hide caption

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Courtesy of Christian Macedonia

How A Team Of Elite Doctors Changed The Military's Stance On Brain Trauma

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Katherine Du/NPR

David Gilkey is seen in 2013 at NPR's Afghanistan bureau as he started a month in the country. David wore silver bracelets on his wrist as a kind of good luck charm. He said every time he had a near-death experience, he let one go. He threw one into the Euphrates River after the second battle of Fallujah. Another went into the Helmand River after he covered the arrival of U.S. Marines in 2009. Graham Paul Smith/NPR hide caption

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Graham Paul Smith/NPR

David Gilkey Was 'An Incredibly Thoughtful' Photographer In The Midst Of Plight

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Young boys wave smoldering tin cans at cars in Kabul, Afghanistan. The smoke from the seeds inside the cans is believed to ward off evil. Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR hide caption

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Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR

'He Had A Great Eye For A Story'

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A member of the Afghan army looks on as an artillery gun fires at Taliban fighters in the hills of Nangahar Province, in eastern Afghanistan, in 2015. NPR photographer David Gilkey, who was killed Sunday, embedded with the Afghan military on multiple occasions to see how it was faring in its fight against the Taliban. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR