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Inspektor Jan Gieber of Austrian police shows the inside of the large van outside the police station in Braunau, Upper Austria, on Sunday, where the children were found among 26 migrants trying to reach Europe. Daniel Scharinger/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Daniel Scharinger/EPA/Landov

Migrants from Africa receive instruction in French in the port city of Calais. Some 3,000 migrants live in a makeshift camp known as "The Jungle." Most are seeking to travel on to Britain, while some are seeking asylum in France. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Afghan security forces and British soldiers inspect the site of a suicide attack in the heart of Kabul, Afghanistan, on Saturday. Three American civilian contractors are reportedly among the dead. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

Afghan security forces inspect a suicide bombing attack on Aug. 10 near the main gate of Kabul's international airport. It was one of a series of recent attacks in the Afghan capital that have left at least 50 dead. Violence in Afghanistan has increased since U.S. combat troops pulled out last year. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

A 1998 file photo of Ayman al-Zawahri speaking at a news conference in Khost, Afghanistan. The reclusive al-Qaida leader says he has pledged support to the new chief of the Taliban, Mullah Akhtar Mansoor. Mazhar Ali Khan/AP hide caption

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Mazhar Ali Khan/AP

National Geographic photographer Steve McCurry, shown in Kuwait in 1991, says his big break came at a refugee camp near Peshawar, Pakistan, after he heard the sound of children laughing. Courtesy of Steve McCurry hide caption

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Courtesy of Steve McCurry

How One Photographer Captured A Piercing Gaze That Shook The World

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John Sopko, special inspector general for Afghanistan reconstruction, testifies on Capitol Hill last June. In a letter released Thursday, Sopko says the U.S. may have been paying for "ghost schools, ghost students and ghost teachers" in Afghanistan. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

A group of Afghan women are attempting to reach the 24,580-foot summit this summer. In mid-May, two of the climbers, along with two American chaperones, visited Afghanistan's highest mountain to see the terrain firsthand in preparation for the historic climb. Soraya Sarhaddi-Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi-Nelson/NPR

For Afghan Women Mountaineers, Uphill Battles Begin Before The Climb

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Lt. Gen. Abdul Raziq is the police chief widely credited with bringing much greater security to the southern Afghan city of Kandahar. But critics accuse him of human rights abuses including torture and extrajudicial killings. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

He Calmed Kandahar. But At What Cost?

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