Afghanistan Afghanistan

Members of the Taliban militia ride in vehicles during Afghanistan's annual Independence Day parade in Kabul on Aug. 19, 2001. Afghanistan was largely cut off from the world during the Taliban's rule from 1996 to 2001. That changed dramatically after the Sept. 11 attacks. Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images

The Gardez Hospital in Afghanistan's Paktia province as seen in 2012. The U.S.-funded hospital still has construction deficiencies nearly five years after the original target date for its completion. SIGAR hide caption

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SIGAR

Afghan security forces rush to respond to an attack on the campus of American University of Kabul on Wednesday. "We are trying to assess the situation," President Mark English told The Associated Press. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Afghan police train with their weapons in Lashkar Gah, Afghanistan, in July. Hundreds of U.S. troops are deployed to train and assist security forces in Helmand province, where the Taliban have recently made territorial gains. Abdul Khaliq/AP hide caption

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Abdul Khaliq/AP

Micah Johnson, who authorities have identified as the shooter who killed five law enforcement officers in Dallas on July 7 during a protest over recent fatal police shootings of black men. AP hide caption

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AP

Ameera, 6, walks with assistance at the Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. She is recovering from a gunshot wound sustained when she was caught in a firefight between U.S. and Afghan soldiers and Taliban insurgents. Senior Airman Robert Dantzler/U.S. Air Force hide caption

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Senior Airman Robert Dantzler/U.S. Air Force

Ameera, A 6-Year-Old Afghan, Prepares To Walk Out Of U.S. Military Hospital

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An Afghan protester screams near the scene of a suicide attack that targeted crowds of minority Shiite Hazaras during a demonstration in Kabul on Saturday. Wakil Kohsar /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar /AFP/Getty Images

An Afghan soldier stands at a mortar training range near Kandahar, Afghanistan. The Afghan forces are still receiving help from the U.S. as they battle the Taliban. This photo was taken by NPR's David Gilkey shortly before he was killed by the Taliban on June 5. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Afghanistan: A Tragic Return To A War With No End

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Afghan police inspect the site in in Kabul, Afghanistan, where a bus convoy was attacked on Thursday. The buses carrying police cadets were targeted as they were on their way from the neighboring Maidan Wardak province to Kabul. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

The Gray Team with Maj. Jennifer Bell (center), who ran a concussion clinic, seen in the Helmand province of Afghanistan in 2010: Col. Michael Jaffee (from left) , Capt. James Hancock, Col. Geoffrey Ling, Lt. Col. Shean Phelps and Col. Robert Saum. Courtesy of Christian Macedonia hide caption

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Courtesy of Christian Macedonia

How A Team Of Elite Doctors Changed The Military's Stance On Brain Trauma

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Katherine Du/NPR

Kit Parker's Story Part I

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