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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sits for a portrait in the Lawyer's Lounge at the Supreme Court of the United States. Shuran Huang / NPR hide caption

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Shuran Huang / NPR

Justice Ginsburg: 'I Am Very Much Alive'

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Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, then 91, works in his office at the Supreme Court on Sept. 28, 2011. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, A Maverick On The Bench, Dies At 99

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Justice Clarence Thomas, the longest-serving member of the current Supreme Court, has views that perhaps can be described only as unique. Some court watchers, however, use other terms: idiosyncratic, eccentric, provocative, thoughtful and, yes, wacky. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., speaks at an event in February in North Las Vegas, Nev., while campaigning for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Chief Justice John Roberts is positioning the Supreme Court in a way that has both conservatives and liberals complaining and wondering what exactly Roberts is trying to do. Jabin Botsford/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/AFP/Getty Images

Fear And Loathing At The Supreme Court — What Is Chief Justice John Roberts Up To?

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Demonstrators against a proposal to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in April. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Activists at the Supreme Court opposed to partisan gerrymandering hold up representations of congressional districts from North Carolina (left) and Maryland on March 26. On June 27, justices decided that the practice is beyond the reach of federal courts. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

To Gerrymander Or Not To Gerrymander? That's The Question For Democrats

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People gather in front of the Supreme Court last week, some opposing the controversial citizenship question that the Trump administration tried to add to the 2020 census. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Trump Administration To Print 2020 Census Without Citizenship Question

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Alison Beyea of ACLU of Maine speaks during an abortion-rights rally at Congress Square Park in Portland, Maine, in May. Democrats elected last November have pushed through two laws that expand access to abortion in the state. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Newly Blue, Maine Expands Access To Abortion

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Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan took on more of the consequential writings for the court's liberals this past term. Above, Kagan testifies on Capitol Hill about the court's budget. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The printing of 1.5 billion paper forms and other mailings for the 2020 census was scheduled to begin on July 1. Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

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Amr Alfiky/NPR

Trump Administration's Delay In Census Printing Sets Up Count's 'Biggest Risk'

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Demonstrators rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in April to protest the Trump administration's plan to add a citizenship question to forms for the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrators rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court in April to protest against the Trump administration's efforts to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Threatens Census Delay After Supreme Court Leaves Citizenship Question Blocked

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The Wendell Smith's liquor store in Nashville, Tenn., pictured in 2013. The court struck down a Tennessee alcohol licensing residency requirement, opening up the pathway for big-box stores to enter the market. Erik Schelzig/AP hide caption

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Erik Schelzig/AP

The Supreme Court has long upheld the right of access to a wide range of judicial proceedings and records. An order Monday unsealing records in an Alabama death penalty case continued that tradition. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Los Angeles artist Erik Brunetti, the founder of the streetwear clothing company FUCT, leaves the Supreme Court after his trademark case was argued on April 15. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Strikes Down Ban On Trademarking 'Immoral,' 'Scandalous' Words, Symbols

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The Supreme Court has struck down a conviction of a death row inmate, citing racial bias in jury selection. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Strikes Down Conviction Of Mississippi Man On Death Row For 22 Years

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