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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee during his confirmation hearing Sept. 6. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 6, the third day of his confirmation hearing. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A protester is led away by police after disrupting the second day of the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh walks to meet with senators on Capitol Hill last month. He faces days of questioning from senators beginning Tuesday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Kavanaugh Confirmation Hearings To Focus On 6 Hot-Button Issues

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Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., flanked by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. (left), and Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., at a news conference Thursday, where they said they will sue the National Archives if they don't get the documents on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh that they requested. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Activists from Concerned Women for America make a stop on their bus tour in Indianapolis, where Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly is facing pressure from the right as he prepares to vote on the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh just weeks before Election Day. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Kavanaugh Fight Puts Vulnerable Senators In A Tight Spot

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Nageeb Alomari, an American citizen, was attempting to bring his family to the U.S. from war-torn Yemen when the Trump administration instituted its now successfully-upheld travel ban, which included his home country. Wesaam Al-Badry for NPR hide caption

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Wesaam Al-Badry for NPR

A Yemeni-American Wanted To Bring His Family Home. Then Came The Travel Ban.

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President Trump looks on as Judge Brett Kavanaugh speaks after being nominated to the Supreme Court last month. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

What A Justice Kavanaugh Could Mean For The Mueller Investigation And Trump

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President Trump mouths the words, "You're fired," during a signing ceremony for the Department of Veterans Affairs Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017 at the White House. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Is Trump About To Be Able To Say 'You're Fired' To A Lot More People?

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President Trump announces US Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his nominee to the Supreme Court in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

As Supreme Court Nears Solid Conservative Majority, GOP Reaps Reward From 'Long Game'

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Protesters spread their dueling messages at a March for Life rally in 2016. Only 17 percent of Americans say they want the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling overturned, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Anti-gun violence advocate and Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting survivor Emma Gonzales, center, at a rally in Chicago in June. The students from the Parkland, Fla., school have become vocal anti-gun advocates, but a more conservative Supreme Court may stymie their efforts. Jim Young/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Young/AFP/Getty Images

Kavanaugh Could Tip Supreme Court Against Gun Control Laws

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Then-Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg greets her husband, Martin, during her confirmation hearing in 1993. She didn't hesitate to answer questions about Roe v. Wade and other topics she considered settled law. John Duricka/AP hide caption

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John Duricka/AP

The Ginsburg Rule: False Advertising By The GOP

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Abortion-rights supporters in Seattle protest on Tuesday against President Trump and his choice of federal appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his second nominee to the Supreme Court. Activists are preparing for the possibility that Kavanaugh's confirmation could weaken abortion rights. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Abortion Rights Advocates Preparing For Life After Roe v. Wade

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (from left), Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Vice President Pence met on Capitol Hill Tuesday, ahead of meetings with Republican senators. Democrats vow to challenge Kavanaugh's nomination in upcoming hearings. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images