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Supreme Court Justices Neil Gorsuch (left) and Brett Kavanaugh wrote opposing opinions in a high-profile case involving Apple's App Store. The two Trump appointees are seen here at the Capitol in February. Doug Mills/Pool / Reuters hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool / Reuters

Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, pictured in 2014, says he can no longer get around the tennis court safely, but he can play a decent game of Ping-Pong. William Thomas Cain/Getty Images hide caption

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William Thomas Cain/Getty Images

Retired Justice John Paul Stevens Talks History, His New Book And Ping-Pong

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The Supreme Court justices are hearing oral arguments Tuesday over the citizenship question the Trump administration wants to add to forms for the 2020 census. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Supreme Court Appears To Lean Toward Allowing Census Citizenship Question

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A U.S. flag sits on the lap of a newly sworn-in citizen at a 2018 naturalization ceremony in Alexandria, Va. A new appeal in one of the lawsuits over the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census could complicate final preparations for the head count. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Los Angeles artist Erik Brunetti, the founder of the streetwear clothing company "FUCT," leaves the Supreme Court after his trademark case was argued on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Dances Around The F-Word With Real Potential Financial Consequences

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Institute for Justice lawyer Wesley Hottot in his Seattle office. On the wall is a framed illustration of him arguing Timbs v. Indiana at the Supreme Court last fall. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Defining What's Excessive In Police Property Seizures Remains Tricky

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President Trump listens as Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the census, speaks at the White House. Ross approved including in the 2020 census the question, "Is this person a citizen of the United States?" Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Death penalty opponent Herve Deschamps holds a sign during a vigil outside St. Francis Xavier College Church in St. Louis, hours before the 2014 scheduled execution of death row inmate Russell Bucklew. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

A bump stock, left, is a device that can be added to a gun to increase its firing speed. The devices were banned by the federal government his week. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh had some sharp questions about partisan gerrymandering, as the court heard arguments on it Tuesday. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Kavanaugh Seems Conflicted On Partisan Gerrymandering At Supreme Court Arguments

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Demonstrators protest partisan redistricting in 2017 during oral arguments in a case out of Wisconsin. Olivier Douliery/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/Getty Images

The Supreme Court Takes Another Look At Partisan Redistricting

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Chief Justice John Roberts attends the 37th Kennedy Center Honors at the Kennedy Center on Dec. 7, 2014, in Washington, DC. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

In 'The Chief,' An Enigmatic, Conservative John Roberts Walks A Political Tightrope

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People line up to enter the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Justices Seem Incredulous At Repeated Racial Bias In Jury Selection

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Lee Boyd Malvo, pictured in 2003, listens to court proceedings during the trial of fellow sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad in Virginia Beach, Va. Martin Smith-Rodden/AP hide caption

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Martin Smith-Rodden/AP

Evan Thomas breaks new ground with extraordinary access to Sandra Day O'Connor, her papers, journals — and even 20 years of her husband's diary. Mike Moore/WireImage/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Moore/WireImage/Getty Images

From Triumph To Tragedy, 'First' Tells Story Of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor

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Vernon Madison was sentenced to death for the 1985 murder of a Mobile, Ala., police officer. Alabama Department of Corrections via AP hide caption

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Alabama Department of Corrections via AP