Supreme Court Supreme Court

Currently, polling places are largely a politics-free zone, but the Supreme Court heard arguments that could change that. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Should Polling Places Remain Politics-Free? Justices Incredulous At Both Sides

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An unidentified man walks in front of the Microsoft logo at an event in New Delhi. Microsoft is at the center of a Supreme Court case on whether it has to turn over emails stored overseas. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

Court Seems Unconvinced Of Microsoft's Argument To Shield Email Data Stored Overseas

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Six-year-old Sophie Cruz speaks during a rally in front of the Supreme Court next to her father, Raul Cruz, and supporter Jose Antonio Vargas in 2016. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Supreme Court Declines To Take DACA Case, Leaving It In Place For Now

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Members of the American Federation of State County and Municipal Employees union, or AFSCME, listen to a council executive speak about conditions at state prisons and detention centers in Illinois. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Supreme Court Hears Fiery Arguments In Case That Could Gut Public Sector Unions

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The U.S. Supreme Court is shown on Dec. 4, 2017, in Washington, D.C. The court, continuing a years-long pattern, has declined to hear a constitutional challenge to a state gun law. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

In this July 10, 2014, photo, Bobby Bostic is photographed in the visitation room at Crossroads Correctional Center in Cameron, Mo. A former St. Louis judge who sentenced Bostic, then a teenager, to 241 years in prison, says she regrets her ruling and is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to give him the opportunity for reform. Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP hide caption

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Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP

She Sentenced A Teen To 241 Years In Prison. Now She Wants Her Decision Overturned

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Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf delivers his budget address in February 2017 in Harrisburg, Pa. He and Republican leaders have a week to come up with new congressional maps for the state. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Supreme Court Pass Means Pennsylvania Must Redraw Congressional Maps In 10 Days

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Voters cast their ballots in Salem, Ohio, on Nov. 8, 2016. On Wednesday the Supreme Court hears a case about Ohio's voter registration policy. Ty Wright/Getty Images hide caption

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In Key Voting-Rights Case, Court Appears Divided Over Ohio's 'Use It Or Lose It' Rule

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Los Angeles Police inspect a vehicle parked in the same neighborhood as a crime scene in 2012. The Supreme Court heard arguments on Tuesday regarding when police can search a vehicle without a warrant. Jason Redmond/AP hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AP

Mary Hamilton, seen here with James Farmer of CORE, was a civil rights organizer who fought for the right to be addressed as "Miss" in an Alabama court and won. Duane Howell/Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Duane Howell/Denver Post/Getty Images

When 'Miss' Meant So Much More: How One Woman Fought Alabama — And Won

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The U.S. Supreme Court confronts the digital age again on Wednesday. At issue is whether police have to get a search warrant in order to obtain cellphone location information that is routinely collected and stored by wireless providers. Georgijevic/Getty Images hide caption

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