Supreme Court Supreme Court

Abortion rights activists celebrate outside the U.S. Supreme Court Monday for a ruling in a case over a Texas law that places restrictions on abortion clinics. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Marovich/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on a number of cases on Monday, including whether people who have domestic violence convictions should have access to firearms. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Donald Verrilli speaks outside the Supreme Court in Washington after arguments about the death penalty on Jan. 7, 2008. He became solicitor general in 2011. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

The Man Who Argued Health Care For Obama Looks Back As He Steps Down

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Attorney Bert Rein speaks to the media while standing with plaintiff Abigail Noel Fisher after the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in her case in 2012 in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Abigail Fisher, who challenged the use of race in college admissions, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court on Dec. 9, 2015. The Supreme Court upheld the University of Texas' affirmative action program in a 4-3 decision. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A critic of the New York City Police Department stop-and-frisk policy wears a shirt outlining a citizen's search rights at a City Council meeting in August 2013. The Supreme Court ruled Monday in an unrelated case that even if police stop someone without cause, if a reason is then found to search them, any evidence collected is admissible in court. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Oculus cake now being sold by the new caterer running the SFMOMA's upstairs cafe. The cake was inspired by the distinctive tower at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. It is similar in design and spirit to a cake prepared by Caitlin Freeman and her baking team for a museum event several years ago. (See below.) Connor Radnovich/ Courtesy of The San Francisco Chronicle hide caption

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Connor Radnovich/ Courtesy of The San Francisco Chronicle

Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor discuss the court's food traditions. RBG let us in on a secret: The reason she was not entirely awake at the State of the Union? She wasn't totally sober. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

In a 7-1 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court sided with a Georgia death-row inmate appealing his murder conviction, citing efforts by prosecutors to exclude blacks from the jury panel. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Supreme Court Orders New Trial For Black Death Row Inmate Convicted By All-White Jury

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