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Dave Mullins (right) sits with his husband, Charlie Craig, in Denver. The owner of a cake shop refused to make a wedding cake for the couple, citing his religious beliefs, and the couple then filed with the state's civil rights commission. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Muslims and supporters gather on the steps of Borough Hall in Brooklyn, N.Y., during a protest against President Trump's temporary travel ban in February. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP

Supreme Court Revives Parts Of Trump's Travel Ban As It Agrees To Hear Case

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The confluence of the St. Croix, top, and Mississippi Rivers, bottom, is seen from the air on May 31, 2012. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Environmentalists Rejoice: Court Says Land Regulation Doesn't Go 'Too Far'

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The Supreme Court says a lower court erred in its guidance to a jury about the standard for stripping a refugee of her American citizenship. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

The Metropolitan Detention Center in the Brooklyn borough of New York, where the plaintiffs were detained for months following the September 11 attacks. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP

Supreme Court Rules Post-9/11 Detainees Can't Sue Top U.S. Officials

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The Supreme Court has not ruled on "purely partisan gerrymanders," which means drawing voting districts with the aim of strengthening one political party, since 2004. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Married in 2008, Angela Ross (center) and her husband D.J. live in Copper Hill, Va., with two of their five children, Jordis, 11 (left), and Marianna, 7. More than 50 years ago, their interracial marriage would have been illegal in Virginia. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Interracial Marriages Face Pushback 50 Years After Loving

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A man votes in November in Durham, N.C. The U.S. Supreme Court had refused to reinstate strict voter restrictions in time for Election Day. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara D. Davis/Getty Images