Supreme Court Supreme Court

Former Fox News Host Gretchen Carlson came forward and accused her boss, the late Roger Ailes, of sexual harassment. She did so in spite of a clause in her employment agreement requiring her to resolve workplace complaints through private arbitration. Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Fortune hide caption

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Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Fortune

Supreme Court Ruling Could Limit Workplace Harassment Claims, Advocates Say

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Former state Sens. Dale Schultz, at podium, and Tim Cullen discuss gerrymandering in Wisconsin. Ailsa Chang/NPR hide caption

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Ailsa Chang/NPR

Renewed Calls For Patriotism Over Politics When Drawing District Lines

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Edith Windsor greets her supporters as she leaves the Supreme Court in 2013, just months before the court would rule in her favor, striking down the Defense of Marriage Act. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

North Carolina Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger says Democrats are looking to deflect blame for their electoral losses. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

Judicial nominee John Bush was challenged by senators about his conservative views during a committee hearing but ultimately confirmed by the Senate on Thursday. Bingham Greenebaum Doll LLP hide caption

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Bingham Greenebaum Doll LLP

The Supreme Court left in place a lower court's broadened definition of close family members who could be exempt from the travel ban, including the grandparents and cousins of a person in the U.S. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

In this June 1, 2017 file photo Supreme Court Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch is seen during an official group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Justice Neil Gorsuch Votes 100 Percent Of The Time With Most Conservative Colleague

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Dave Mullins (right) sits with his husband, Charlie Craig, in Denver. The owner of a cake shop refused to make a wedding cake for the couple, citing his religious beliefs, and the couple then filed with the state's civil rights commission. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Muslims and supporters gather on the steps of Borough Hall in Brooklyn, N.Y., during a protest against President Trump's temporary travel ban in February. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP

Supreme Court Revives Parts Of Trump's Travel Ban As It Agrees To Hear Case

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The confluence of the St. Croix, top, and Mississippi Rivers, bottom, is seen from the air on May 31, 2012. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Environmentalists Rejoice: Court Says Land Regulation Doesn't Go 'Too Far'

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