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Abortion-rights supporters demonstrate last May in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. A high court decision in a case that could curtail or even overturn Roe v. Wade is set for opening arguments in March. Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Two women who were sexually abused as children say the Jehovah's Witnesses failed to report their abuser to authorities in Montana and instead expelled him from the congregation as punishment until he repented. Pictured, in 2015, is a sign atop the then-world headquarters of the Jehovah's Witnesses in New York. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Student demonstrators cheered in 2015 outside the Supreme Court after learning that the high court had upheld the Affordable Care Act as law of the land. But Republican foes of the federal health law are still working to have it struck down. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

President Barack Obama celebrates with lawmakers after signing into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act health insurance bill in March 2010. Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

The Top Moments From A Decade That Reshaped American Politics

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The case is set to be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court on March 4. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

The Louisiana Clinic At The Center Of Abortion Case Before Supreme Court

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New York police Sgt. Damon Martin in the 75th Precinct field intelligence office, where the walls are covered with photos of seized illegal guns. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Does New York City Need Gun Control?

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Curtis Flowers (center) appears in court in Winona, Miss., on Monday for a bail hearing. His 2010 conviction on murder charges was reversed in June by the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled that prosecutors had excluded black people from the jury. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Tents housing homeless line a street near the LAPD Central Community Police Station in downtown Los Angeles. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

How Boise's Fight Over Homelessness Is Rippling Along The West Coast

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Health insurers say the U.S. government owes them more than $12 billion in payments that were rescinded by a Republican-controlled Congress. The money was supposed to subsidize insurers' expected losses between 2014 and 2016. Phil Roeder/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Roeder/Getty Images

This smokestack, left over from a century of copper mining, spewed up to 24 tons of arsenic per day over an area the size of New York City. Nora Saks/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Nora Saks/Montana Public Radio

Montana Residents Ask Supreme Court To Allow Cleanup Beyond Superfund Requirements

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Next year, Supreme Court justices will hear arguments regarding a Louisiana law that could leave the state with just one clinic that performs abortions. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Faith leaders and members of human rights groups protest outside of the U.S. Capitol during a demonstration calling on Congress not to end refugee resettlement programs on Oct. 15, 2019, in Washington. Trump officials announced in September that it would allow localities to opt out of accepting refugees. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

More than 40 states currently have a felony murder law, which juvenile justice advocates believe unfairly impacts young people. Some lawmakers in states such as Illinois and California have sought to enact reform. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Juvenile Justice Groups Say Felony Murder Charges Harm Children, Young Adults

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Passersby open doors to watch videos at an installation titled Common Ground, which shares personal stories of immigrants who are young entrepreneurs, war heroes and farmers in Miami on Oct. 3. The installation, organized by groups that get funding from the Koch network, aims to reframe discussions about the immigration debate. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Searching For 'Common Ground' On DACA

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Republican Gov. Matt Bevin campaigns outside the governor's mansion in Frankfort, Ky., with anti-abortion-rights activists. Bevin has been a consistent and vocal opponent of abortion rights in Kentucky. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

In Key 2019 Races, Activists Gear Up For Big Fight Over Abortion

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Planned Parenthood plans to spend at least $45 million backing candidates in local, state and national races who support abortion rights. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

Presidential hopeful Beto O'Rourke talks to NPR Host Michel Martin and voters Ruben Sandoval and Connie Martinez. NPR hide caption

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NPR

VIDEO: Beto O'Rourke Wants To Ban, Confiscate Some Guns. Texas Voters Want Details

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Aimee Stephens is at the center of the debate over whether employers can fire workers for being LGBTQ. The Supreme Court will hear her case Tuesday. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Showdown Over LGBTQ Employment Rights Hits Supreme Court

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