Myanmar Myanmar

In the Balukhali refugee camp, boys between the ages of seven and 11 play with forfori, homemade toy airplanes. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

In Bangladeshi Camps, Rohingya Refugees Try To Move Forward With Their Lives

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Myanmar border guard police patrol the fence in the "no man's land" zone between Myanmar and Bangladesh, as seen from Maungdaw, Rakhine state, during a government-organized visit for journalists on Aug. 24. A new U.N. report finds that Myanmar's military and other groups, including the border police, committed atrocities. The report urges the prosecution of military leaders for genocide. Phyo Hein Kyaw/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Phyo Hein Kyaw/AFP/Getty Images

Balukhali Rohingya refugee camp Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Forced To Flee Myanmar, Rohingya Refugees Face Monsoon Landslides In Bangladesh

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Dildar Begum, 30, in her shelter in the Hakimpara Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh. She says 29 members of her extended family were killed a year ago in what the U.S. has said was a campaign of ethnic cleansing by the Myanmar military. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

'I Would Rather Die Than Go Back': Rohingya Refugees Settle Into Life In Bangladesh

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A member of the Myanmar security forces stands guard near a military transport helicopter in Rakhine state last September, about a month into the bloody crackdown on the country's Rohingya Muslim population. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Wa Lone, 32, speaks to reporters as police escort him from the courthouse following his pretrial hearing Monday in Yongon. He is one of two Reuters reporters charged with breaking the country's secrecy law, which carries the possibility of 14 years in prison. Myo Kyaw Soe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Myo Kyaw Soe/AFP/Getty Images

Aung San Suu Kyi celebrated her 73rd birthday with members of her National League for Democracy party at the parliament building in Naypyitaw, Myanmar on Tuesday. Aung Shine Oo/AP hide caption

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Aung Shine Oo/AP

Rohingya Crisis Is Making Some In Myanmar Rethink Their Views Of Aung San Suu Kyi

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Jes Petersen, CEO of Phandeeyar, a Yangon-based tech hub, speaks to visiting U.S. government officials and civil society activists. Phandeeyar is one of several groups that have pressed Facebook to moderate its Burmese-language content to prevent hate speech. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

A Rohingya woman walks past a flooded farm near the Kutupalong Refugee Camp in Bangladesh, where the monsoon season started in June and has caused casualties and landslides. Jana Cavojska / SOPA/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Jana Cavojska / SOPA/LightRocket via Getty Images

A market on the Strand, a main thoroughfare in Sittwe. Anthony Kuhn /NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn /NPR

'Deeply Disturbing' Conditions For Rohingya In Myanmar, And Those Yet To Return

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Hindu women cry at the site of a mass grave that Myanmar troops said they found last September in Maungdaw township. Amnesty International says local village leaders identified dozens of corpses unearthed from the graves the week before. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

A 360-degree camera is used to document the Khe Min Ga Zedi temple in Bagan, Myanmar. Kieran Kesner for CyArk hide caption

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Kieran Kesner for CyArk

3D Scans Help Preserve History, But Who Should Own Them?

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U.N. Special Rapporteur to Myanmar Yanghee Lee speaks at a press conference after reporting to the Human Rights Council in Geneva on Monday. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

Myanmar State Counselor Aung San Suu Kyi, in a national address in September, said she felt deeply for the suffering of all people caught up in conflict scorching through Rakhine state — in her first comments that also mentioned Muslims displaced by violence. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

On the left, a satellite image of the village of Thit Tone Nar Gwa Son on Dec. 2; on the right, the same village seen from space earlier this week. Human rights advocates say the government is destroying what amounts to scores of crime scenes before any credible investigation takes place. DigitalGlobe via AP hide caption

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DigitalGlobe via AP

Ten Rohingya Muslim men kneel with their hands bound as members of the Myanmar security forces stand guard in Inn Din village on Sept. 2, 2017. The photo has been published as part of an extensive Reuters investigation into the massacre of the 10 men, who were fishermen, shop owners, high school students and an Islamic teacher. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

Sanura Begum stands with her son, Abdur Sobor, outside her plastic and bamboo shelter in the Kutupalong refugee camp in Bangladesh. One of the things she misses most about Myanmar is her family's wooden house. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

A Young Rohingya Mom: Pregnant, Stateless, Living In Limbo

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A woman carries water up a steep hill in the Balukhali Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh. Aid workers say these slopes may collapse in the coming monsoon rains. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

Monsoon Rains Could Devastate Rohingya Camps

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Rohingya Muslim children, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, wait squashed against each other to receive food handouts distributed to children and women by a Turkish aid agency at Thaingkhali refugee camp, Bangladesh, in October. Dar Yasin/AP hide caption

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Dar Yasin/AP