Hillary Clinton Hillary Clinton

Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., won re-election as House minority leader on Wednesday with support from just over two-thirds of her caucus. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

Oliver Potts, the director of the Office of the Federal Register, oversees the Electoral College. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Brian Naylor/NPR

Trump's Election Calls Attention To Electoral College And Small Federal Agency

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Hillary Clinton leaves after speaking at the Children's Defense Fund Beat the Odds Celebration at the Newseum in Washington on Nov. 16. It was her first speech since losing the presidential election. Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images

It isn't just the people who went to Trump rallies who think he'll do a good job as president. Here, Trump turns to talk to members of the press at an event in Orlando in March. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Election workers sort through unprocessed vote-by-mail ballots at the Sacramento County Registrar of Voters office on Monday. Ben Adler/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Ben Adler/Capital Public Radio

Hillary Clinton's Popular Vote Lead Is 1.7 Million And Growing. Here's Why

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Vendors congregated outside a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Indiana Theater on May 1, 2016 in Terre Haute, Indiana. Charles Ledford/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Ledford/Getty Images

This Bellwether Has Picked The Winning Presidential Candidate Since The 1890s

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Polls, pundits, politicians and journalists mostly predicted the outcome of this election incorrectly. How did they get it so wrong? Allan Lichtman says the answer to this question gets at what's wrong with politics in America. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

What Happened? How Pollsters, Pundits And Politics Got It Wrong

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