Watergate Watergate

A vendor sells hats to supporters before a campaign rally for then-candidate Donald Trump in Newtown, Pa. While sales of Trump merchandise helped fund his campaign, large donors increasingly dominate the funding of political campaigns. Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

Campaign Finance System Of Big Money Now Overshadows Watergate-Era Reforms

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John Dean, shown testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee in 2006, served as White House counsel to former President Richard Nixon. Dean says he sees echoes of the Watergate scandal in the Trump administration and its handling of the Russia investigation. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Nixon White House Counsel John Dean Sees Uphill Climb For Trump In Leaks Fight

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Don McGahn, lawyer for Donald Trump and his campaign, leaves the Four Seasons Hotel after a meeting with Trump and Republican donors on June 9, 2016, in New York City. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

'The Quiet Man': The Powerful Conservative White House Lawyer In The Middle Of It All

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Jeremiah Tower is the subject of The Last Magnificent, a new documentary on his crash-and-burn career. It was produced by Anthony Bourdain, who feels that Tower has been denied his due in the American culinary pantheon. Courtesy of The Orchard hide caption

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Courtesy of The Orchard

People walk past the entrance of the parking garage where reporter Bob Woodward held late night meetings with Deep Throat, his Watergate source who later turned out to be Mark Felt, the FBI's former No. 2 official. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Thousands Of Toys Wash Ashore On German Island

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Ben Bradlee, then-executive editor of The Washington Post, looks at the front page of the newspaper, headlined "Nixon Resigns," in the composing room on Aug. 8, 1974. David R. Legge/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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David R. Legge/Washington Post/Getty Images

Ben Bradlee, Who Led 'Washington Post' To New Heights, Dies At 93

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Democratic Rep. Henry Waxman of California fields a flurry of phone calls in his Capitol Hill office just after announcing Thursday that he'll retire after 40 years in the House of Representatives. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A reporter (not Deep Throat) strikes a dramatic pose beside one of the columns inside the Arlington, Va., garage where Bob Woodward met with his secret source during the Watergate days. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Buttons from 4 of the 5 original members of the Class of '74 who still serve in Congress. (Will someone please tell Henry Waxman to make a button?) Ken Rudin collection hide caption

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Ken Rudin collection

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