media bias media bias

Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images David McNew/ AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/ AFP/Getty Images

The Weight of Our Words

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Greg Calhoun, President-elect Donald Trump and Steve Harvey speak with the media Friday at Trump Tower in New York. Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

Arianna Huffington, president and editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post Media Group, speaks at the 2014 World Economic Forum. Reporters and editors in 15 countries will contribute to "What Works," her site's new initiative focused on covering positive news. Ruben Sprich/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Ruben Sprich/Reuters/Landov

Huffington Post Bets People Will Read Good News — And Share It, Too

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