Pew Research Center Pew Research Center

Vietnamese-Americans light candles at St. Helena, a Catholic church in Philadelphia, on April 4. Like many other once-struggling churches, St. Helena has been revitalized by immigrant parishioners. About 200 Vietnamese families worship at this church, along with others from Latin America, the Philippines and Africa. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Rourke/AP

Built By Immigrants, U.S. Catholic Churches Bolstered By Them Once Again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/437219447/438797742" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Andrew Kohut (right) and Bruce Stokes are guests at the Christian Science Monitor breakfast on May 3, 2006 in Washington, D.C. Andy Nelson/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andy Nelson/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images

Boys in Uppsala, Sweden, read supportive messages placed at the entrance of a mosque following an attack in January. A new Pew study finds that religious intolerance is a global problem, with Muslims facing more hostility from individuals, and Christians from governments. Targeting of Jews, the study found, has gotten worse over in recent years. Anders Wiklund/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Anders Wiklund/AP

Pew Study On Religion Finds Increased Harassment Of Jews

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/389250366/389321649" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Genetically modified rice plants are shown in a lab in 2006. A new report from Pew Research shows a wide gap between perceptions of safety of GM foods between scientists and the general public. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Occupy Wall Street protesters join a labor union rally in Foley Square before marching on Zuccotti Park in New York's Financial District in 2011. A new report shows that wealth inequality between whites and nonwhites grew during the Great Recession. Jason DeCrow/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jason DeCrow/AP

More than 65 percent of first marriages today are between couples already living together. For millennials, cohabitation is almost a rite of passage. Oliver Hoffmann/iStock hide caption

toggle caption
Oliver Hoffmann/iStock

Millennials Navigate The Ups And Downs Of Cohabitation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/358876955/360719271" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript