torture torture
Stories About

torture

A demonstration in Copenhagen, Denmark, in support of Syrian migrants. A new study looks at the benefit of offering physical and psychological support to refugees who have been tortured. Frédéric Soltan/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frédéric Soltan/Corbis via Getty Images

CIA nominee Gina Haspel testifies before the Senate intelligence committee on Wednesday. Alleged Sept. 11 planner Khalid Sheikh Mohammed says he has information that could be relevant to her nomination. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Gina Haspel, an undercover CIA officer for three decades, has been nominated to become director of the spy agency. Several senators say they will be asking tough questions about her role in the CIA's waterboarding program that began after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. AP via CIA hide caption

toggle caption
AP via CIA

Omar al-Shogre says he spent 10 months in Sednaya prison. He says he was arrested at age 17 and was in various Syrian prisons for more than two years before he was sent to Sednaya. Courtesy of Omar al-Shogre hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Omar al-Shogre

Former Detainee Describes Atrocities Inside Syrian Prison

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/514326212/514365658" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Images of dead bodies in Syrian prisons, taken by a Syrian forensic photographer, were displayed at the United Nations last year. They were also put on exhibit at the U.S. Capitol last July. A range of activists and groups are trying to find better ways to document torture and prosecute those responsible. Lucas Jackson/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Lucas Jackson/Reuters

Documenting Torture: Doctors Search For New Ways To Gather Evidence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479128985/479128986" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stanley Wrice pauses in December 2013 as he speaks to the media with his lawyer, Heidi Linn Lambros (left), and his daughter, Gail Lewis, while leaving Pontiac Correctional Center in Pontiac, Ill. Wrice was released after serving more than 30 years. He claimed for decades that Chicago police detectives under the command of then-Lt. Jon Burge beat and coerced him into confessing to rape. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

toggle caption
M. Spencer Green/AP

President George W. Bush speaks to Vice President Dick Cheney by phone aboard Air Force One after departing Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska on Sept. 11, 2001. Eric Draper /AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Draper /AP

As Torture Report's Release Nears, CIA And Opponents Ready Responses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/369536790/369536791" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Senate intelligence committee chairwoman Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., is again defending her report on CIA torture methods, which was set to be released this week. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP