Israel Israel

Israeli security forces and emergency personnel gather at the site of a vehicle-ramming attack in Jerusalem on Sunday. Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images

Israeli soldier Elor Azaria, who was caught on video shooting a wounded Palestinian assailant in the head as he lay on the ground, speaks with his lawyers upon his arrival for a hearing at a military appeals court in Tel Aviv on Nov. 23, 2016. Azaria has been found guilty of manslaughter. Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images

Jenna and Gil Lewinsky with their sheep under temporary quarantine in the Israeli desert. Jacob Sheep are found in the U.K. and North America, but the Lewinskys say the breed originally roamed the Middle East and ancient Israel. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

Farmers On Mission To Return 'Old Testament Sheep' To Holy Land

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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry laid out his vision for peace between Israel and the Palestinians Wednesday. In the more than hourlong address, Kerry criticized Jewish settlements in the West Bank as an impediment to peace. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

The U.N. Security Council has condemned Israel's construction of settlements, with Ambassador Samantha Power saying the project hurts Israel's security. In this photo from March, soldiers guard the Gush Etzion junction near a cluster of settlements in the West Bank. Mahmoud Illean/AP hide caption

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Mahmoud Illean/AP

Israeli activists who lobbied Israeli-Americans to vote for Donald Trump gather around a boardroom table to celebrate his victory. Israel's right wing anticipates that a Trump administration will not pressure Israel regarding settlements. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

Israel's Right Wing Expects Boost From A Trump Presidency

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During his campaign for president in March, Donald Trump spoke at the 2016 American Israel Public Affairs Committee Policy Conference in Washington, D.C. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Could A Trump Presidency Be Pro-Israel And White Nationalist At The Same Time?

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Members of Women of the Wall, which lobbies for women to be allowed to sing and pray aloud at the Western Wall, march through the Jewish quarter of Jerusalem's Old City. The group organizes monthly marches and are often heckled by ultra-Orthodox men. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

Women's Rights Become A Battleground For Israel's Ultra-Orthodox Jews

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Both Israel and Palestinians claim Jerusalem as capital. No country maintains an embassy in the city. yeowatzup/Flickr hide caption

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yeowatzup/Flickr

Trump Favors Moving U.S. Embassy To Jerusalem, Despite Backlash Fears

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Ultra-Orthodox Jews, many of whom live in closed religious communities, on a bus tour of the Israeli offices of Google, Facebook and Microsoft. The tour is sponsored by KamaTech, a group that helps integrate the ultra-Orthodox into Israel's high-tech sector. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

As Israel's Ultra-Orthodox Enter The Workforce, High-Tech Beckons

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Tamer Nafar (center), performs with the hip-hop group DAM. The members are all Arabs who are citizens of Israel, and some of their lyrics are harshly critical of the state. They see it as artistic freedom, while Israel's culture minister says such language could incite violence. Courtesy of Christopher Hazou hide caption

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Courtesy of Christopher Hazou

Arab Rapper Tests The Limit Of Israel's Artistic Freedoms

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The skyline in Tel Aviv, the business capital of Israel. Some business leaders are calling for more Arabs in management. Arabs account for about 20 percent of Israel's citizens, but less than 1 percent of managers. JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images

In Israel, A Push To Get More Arabs Into Management

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