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Israeli soldiers stand guard on the main road during the funeral of Dalia Lemkus on Nov. 11, 2014. Lemkus, who lived in the West Bank Jewish settlement of Tekoa, was killed in a stabbing attack. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

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Sebastian Scheiner/AP

In The West Bank, Barriers Don't Necessarily Make Good Neighbors

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Within the current prayer area, to the left of the wooden bridge, a division between the men's and women's sections is marked by a barrier. The new prayer space will be to the right of the bridge. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

New Western Wall Rules Break Down Barriers For Jewish Women

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Palestinian activist Issa Amro advocates nonviolence in the West Bank city of Hebron. He recently talked a teenage girl out of an attack, but acknowledges it can be difficult to persuade young Palestinians to his position. In the background, Israeli soldiers patrol an olive tree grove next to his home, which the army has declared off-limits to non-residents. Daniel Estrin for NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin for NPR

In Hebron, A City Hit Hard By Violence, A Palestinian Preaches Nonviolence

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Known as the "numbers cemetery," this burial ground on an old military base in the off-limits zone close to Israel's border with Jordan holds the remains of some Palestinians. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Israel's Return Of Palestinian Bodies Is Fraught With Emotion And Politics

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An Israeli soldier eats a piece of watermelon near Israel's border with the Gaza Strip in 2014. As more Israelis go vegan, the country's military has made dietary and clothing accommodations for soldiers. Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images

Joel Touitou Laloux's family owned Paris' Bataclan theater from 1976 until last year, when the performance hall was sold and he retired to Israel. He's shown here on Nov. 18 at his home in the Mediterranean coastal city of Ashdod in southern Israel. Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images

From Retirement In Israel, Bataclan Ex-Owner Recalls Better Times

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A new synagogue went up almost overnight as the older one was being taken down. They are only a block apart, but the new one is on land that is not part of this lawsuit. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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In The West Bank, A Synagogue Comes Down

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The northern Syrian city of Aleppo — shown here pm March 3 — was once home to a thriving Jewish community. Now its Jews have fled. And for one family, reportedly the last Jews of Aleppo, getting out of Syria wasn't the end of the story. Zein Al-Rifai/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zein Al-Rifai/AFP/Getty Images

From Aleppo To Israel: The Struggle To Save A Jewish Family

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Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (right) was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize along with his foreign minister Shimon Peres (center) and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat in 1994. Rabin signed an agreement with the Palestinians that launched negotiations between the two sides, though they've never reached a peace deal. Government Press Office via Getty Images hide caption

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Government Press Office via Getty Images

20 Years After Rabin's Assassination, Israelis Still Debate His Legacy

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Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (left), and Palestinian leader leader Yasser Arafat reach an interim agreement as President Clinton looks on at the White house on Sept. 28, 1995. Rabin was killed by an extremist Jew five weeks later. DOUG MILLS/AP hide caption

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DOUG MILLS/AP

20 Years Later, The Question Lingers: What If Yitzhak Rabin Had Lived?

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Palestinian shoppers walk near Damascus Gate in Jerusalem's Old City, under the watchful eye of Israeli police and wall-mounted security cameras. Amid the recent violence, there's talk of placing cameras inside the city's most contested religious site, known as the Temple Mount to Jews and the Al-Aqsa mosque compound to Muslims. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow for NPR

Proposed Cameras At Jerusalem Shrine Put The Focus On Mutual Mistrust

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