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Armed Palestinian masked militants push back a crowd of worshippers outside a mosque in Gaza City on August 22, 2014, before executing more than a dozen men for allegedly helping Israel during its six-week assault on the Palestinian enclave. This week, Amnesty International released a report saying that Hamas was responsible for these and other killings. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Under Cover Of Conflict, Hamas Killed Palestinians, Amnesty Alleges

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Haneen Radi, an Arab Israeli, wants to organize a marathon for her town of Tira, but was told the run couldn't include women. When she insisted, she received threats, and the back window of her car was shot out. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Trying To Organize A Marathon, An Arab-Israeli Woman Runs Into Opposition

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President Obama tells The Atlantic that the loss of Ramadi to the self-declared Islamic State is a "setback," but he denies the U.S. is losing to the group. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP

FIFA President Sepp Blatter kicks a ball during the inauguration of a football stadium in the village of Dura al-Qari near the West Bank city of Ramallah on Wednesday. Blatter said he is on a "mission of peace" to resolve tensions between the Israeli and Palestinian soccer federations. Majdi Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Majdi Mohammed/AP

For Israel, Soccer Becomes A Geopolitical Football

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Displaced Palestinians seek shelter in the courtyard of a United Nations-run elementary school in Jabaliya, a northern Gaza town, in July 2014 — shortly before the school was hit by what the UN says was Israeli artillery. Israel has opened a criminal investigation into the attack. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Will Israel Charge Soldiers In Gaza Civilian Deaths?

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Ayelet Shaked of the right-wing Jewish Home party, shown here on May 6, is Israel's new justice minister. During her two years in parliament, she called for bringing more conservative judges to Israel's highest court. Gali Tibbon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gali Tibbon/AFP/Getty Images

Why Everyone's Talking About Israel's New Justice Minister

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Pope Francis meets with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank city of Bethlehem on May 25, 2014. The Vatican officially recognized the state of Palestine in a new treaty finalized today. Andrew Medichini/AP hide caption

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Andrew Medichini/AP

For many commuters, standing in the parking lot after driving to work wouldn't be noteworthy. But for rheumatologist Anas Muhana, it's a big deal. He's one of only 100 Palestinian West Bank residents now permitted to drive his own car, with its white-and-green plates, to his job in Israel. The Israeli military banned Palestinian-plated cars for the past 15 years. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

With Small Shifts, Israel Eases Restrictions On Some Palestinians

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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, shown speaking in Washington in March, announced a new coalition government on Wednesday night. The deal assures Netanyahu of a fourth term, but he has a narrow majority in parliament with a coalition that could be vulnerable to collapse. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

African migrants, many from Eritrea and Sudan, raise their hands as part of a protest at the Holot detention center in southern Israel on Feb. 17, 2014. Tesfai Kidane, an Eritrean who left the center last year and returned to Africa, was later killed by the Islamic State in Libya. It was not clear how he wound up in Libya. Oded Balilty/AP hide caption

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Oded Balilty/AP

From Israel To ISIS: How A Search For A Safe Haven Took A Wrong Turn

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Palestinian girls walk past buildings in Gaza City that were destroyed during the 50-day war between Israel and Hamas militants in the summer of 2014. Dozens of Israeli soldiers have now given testimonials saying that indiscriminate firing was tolerated, or even encouraged at times. Thomas Coex /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Coex /AFP/Getty Images

Israeli Soldiers: Lax Rules In Gaza War Led To Indiscriminate Fire

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Now this is an international baby: Born to a surrogate mom in Nepal (who was implanted with an egg from a South African donor) and now living in Israel with his parents, Amir Vogel Greengold (left) and Gilad Greengold. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Israeli Dads Welcome Surrogate-Born Baby In Nepal On Earthquake Day

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One of the first homes going up on land bought and sold as part of a Canadian-Palestinian investment firm's effort to properly register plots. Much land in the West Bank is not registered and has no title deed, creating problems for economic development. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Clearing The Tangled Path For Land Ownership In The West Bank

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