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For decades, black women faced lower risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer than did white women. ColorBlind Images/Blend Image/Corbis hide caption

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ColorBlind Images/Blend Image/Corbis

Jeffrey Okonye (left) and Oviea Akpotaire are fourth-year medical students at the University of Texas Southwestern. Lauren Silverman/KERA hide caption

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Lauren Silverman/KERA

There Were Fewer Black Men In Medical School In 2014 Than In 1978

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"Because he wasn't raised where health was an issue in the household. There was nobody talkin' about health, probably nobody talking about not smoking or drinking or unhealthy practices, what it could lead to. There was nobody talkin' about that." National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion hide caption

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National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Genie Nguyen came to the U.S. from Vietnam in 1975 and remembers voting for President Reagan. But, she said, she now feels Republicans have "gone too far to the right." Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

How Asian-American Voters Went From Republican To Democratic

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Mexican and Mexican-American families wait to board Mexico-bound trains in Los Angeles on March 8, 1932. County officials arranged these mass departures as part of "repatriation campaigns," fueled by fears that Mexicans and Mexican-Americans were taking scarce jobs and government assistance during the Great Depression. Los Angeles Public Library/Herald Examiner Collection hide caption

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Los Angeles Public Library/Herald Examiner Collection

Mass Deportation May Sound Unlikely, But It's Happened Before

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Dylann Roof, seen here at a recent court hearing in Charleston, S.C., will face federal hate crime charges over a mass shooting that police say he carried out at a black church. Grace Beahm/AP hide caption

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Grace Beahm/AP

He's Shared 'Every Single Word' — But It's The Silence That Rings Louder

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