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Whiteness Project participants were filmed talking about race. The project doesn't use their names, to encourage frankness. Feral Films, Inc. hide caption

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Feral Films, Inc.

The Whiteness Project: Facing Race In A Changing America

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This July 1943 photo provided by the Los Angeles Chapter, Tuskegee Airmen Inc., shows Lowell C. Steward after his graduation from flight training at Tuskegee Army Air Field, in Tuskegee, Ala. Steward, who won the Distinguished Flying Cross among other awards, died on Wednesday at age 95. AP hide caption

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AP

A still from the art film #Blackmendream. The film features nine men, turned away from the camera and talking about their hopes and fears. Courtesy artist hide caption

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Courtesy artist

'#Blackmendream': Showcasing A Different Side Of Black Manhood

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Melissa W. Green, right, and her daughter Reshae Green holds up their signs at Freedom Plaza during the "Justice for All" march and rally on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington on Saturday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Marc Quarles, his wife, Claudia Paul, and their children, Joshua and Danielle, live in an affluent, predominantly white neighborhood in California. Quarles says his neighbors treat him differently when his children aren't around. Courtesy of Marc Quarles hide caption

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Courtesy of Marc Quarles

Six Words: 'With Kids, I'm Dad. Alone, Thug'

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The Rev. Martin Luther King makes a statement at the Justice Department in Washington on Dec. 1, 1964 after a meeting with FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. Under Hoover's leadership, the FBI investigated King and his personal life for years. Bob Schutz/AP hide caption

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Bob Schutz/AP

Robert Lee Watt was a member of the Los Angeles Philharmonic for more than three decades. Courtesy of Rowman & Littlefield Publishers hide caption

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Courtesy of Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

'The Black Horn': Blowing Past Classical Music's Color Barriers

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Debra Blackmon (left) was sterilized by court order in 1972, at age 14. With help from her niece, Latoya Adams (right), she's fighting to be included in the state's compensation program. Eric Mennel/WUNC hide caption

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Eric Mennel/WUNC

Payments Start For N.C. Eugenics Victims, But Many Won't Qualify

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Lacey Williams (from left), Mary Espinosa, Jaime Villegas, Armando Cruz Martinez and Elisa Benitez talk inside the offices of the Latin American Coalition in Charlotte, N.C. According to a 2011 Pew Hispanic report, the median age of Latinos in North Carolina is 24. Andy McMillan for NPR hide caption

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Andy McMillan for NPR

In North Carolina, Latino Voters Could Decide Tight Senate Race

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Waverly Adcock, a sergeant and founder of the West Augusta Guard, prepares his company for inspection and battle at a Civil War re-enactment in Virginia. Sara Smith, whose great-great-grandfather was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, holds the Confederate battle flag. Courtesy of Jesse Dukes hide caption

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Courtesy of Jesse Dukes

Six Words: 'Must We Forget Our Confederate Ancestors?'

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