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Death penalty opponent Herve Deschamps holds a sign during a vigil outside St. Francis Xavier College Church in St. Louis, hours before the 2014 scheduled execution of death row inmate Russell Bucklew. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Firefighters battled a massive fire at the St. Louis Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum on Tuesday. The museum houses some of collector David Karpeles' collection of original manuscripts, one of the largest in the world. St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images

Supporters of Missouri's redistricting ballot measure hold signs behind former state Sen. Bob Johnson during a news conference in Jefferson City, Mo., in August. David A. Lieb/AP hide caption

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David A. Lieb/AP

Missouri Voters Backed An Anti-Gerrymandering Measure; Lawmakers Want To Undo It

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Duck boats sit idle in the parking lot of Ride the Ducks days after the accident in July in Branson, Mo. Kenneth Scott McKee, the captain and operator of a boat that sank on July 19, was charged on Thursday with criminal misconduct and negligence resulting in 17 deaths on Table Rock Lake. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Michigan has become the first state in the Midwest to legalize recreational marijuana, after voters approved a ballot measure Tuesday. Here, a clerk reaches for a container of marijuana buds at Utopia Gardens, a medical marijuana dispensary in Detroit. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Philip Bennett repairs machines at Mid Continent Nail in Poplar Bluff, Mo. A self-proclaimed Democrat who voted for Donald Trump in 2016, Bennett's support for the president has waned since Trump instituted steel tariffs earlier this year. NPR hide caption

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VIDEO: As Elections Loom, Workers In Trump Country Reckon With Tariffs Fallout

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Voters cast their ballots at a polling station at Hazelwood Central High School on November 8, 2016 in Florissant, Missouri. A state judge has ruled state election authorities can no longer tell voters they must show a photo ID to cast a ballot, blocking parts of a law. Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

The state of Missouri has just one health clinic that provides abortions as of Wednesday, following new state requirements. In this 2017 photo, Planned Parenthood supporters and opponents protest and counterprotest in St. Louis. Jim Salter/AP hide caption

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Jim Salter/AP

A variety of cuts of beef and ground beef are displayed for sale at Union Market in Washington, D.C. A new Missouri law says only products like these cuts that are "derived from harvested production livestock or poultry" can be labeled as meat. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Archbishop Robert Carlson pictured at Cathedral Basilica on Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, in St. Louis. On Thursday, he invited AG Josh Hawley to review church records and it's handling of sexual abuse allegations. Robert Cohen/AP hide caption

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Robert Cohen/AP

An amphibious boat is seen at Ride The Ducks on July 20, in Branson, Mo. On Friday, the National Transportation Safety Board released a preliminary report of video captured in the minutes leading up to the deadly accident. Michael Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Thomas/Getty Images

Salvage equipment to remove the capsized duck boat is transported to a staging area at Table Rock Lake near Branson, Mo. The U.S. Coast Guard oversaw the operation on Monday. Petty Officer 3rd Class Lora Ratliff/U.S. Coast Guard District 8 hide caption

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Petty Officer 3rd Class Lora Ratliff/U.S. Coast Guard District 8

Emergency workers patrol an area of Table Rock Lake in Branson, Mo., on Friday, a day after a duck boat capsized and sank during a storm. Authorities say 17 people died in the accident. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

9 Of Those Killed In Duck Boat Capsizing Were Related

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Then-Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens in May 2017. A special prosecutor said Friday she has decided not to refile an invasion-of-privacy charge against him. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Gov. Eric Greitens delivers the keynote address at a police memorial prayer breakfast on April 25, at the St. Charles Convention Center. Greitens has announced he will resign on Friday. Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens faces a felony invasion of privacy charge for allegedly taking a semi-nude photo of a woman without her consent. On Tuesday, his cellphone and email were examined as part of the trial. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens delivers the annual State of the State address in January. Missouri lawmakers have called on him to resign, though he calls the case against him a "witch hunt." Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens failed in his attempt to have the case against him dismissed. St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department via Reuters hide caption

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St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department via Reuters