Missouri Missouri

Emergency workers patrol an area of Table Rock Lake in Branson, Mo., on Friday, a day after a duck boat capsized and sank during a storm. Authorities say 17 people died in the accident. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

9 Of Those Killed In Duck Boat Capsizing Were Related

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Then-Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens in May 2017. A special prosecutor said Friday she has decided not to refile an invasion-of-privacy charge against him. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Gov. Eric Greitens delivers the keynote address at a police memorial prayer breakfast on April 25, at the St. Charles Convention Center. Greitens has announced he will resign on Friday. Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens faces a felony invasion of privacy charge for allegedly taking a semi-nude photo of a woman without her consent. On Tuesday, his cellphone and email were examined as part of the trial. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens delivers the annual State of the State address in January. Missouri lawmakers have called on him to resign, though he calls the case against him a "witch hunt." Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens failed in his attempt to have the case against him dismissed. St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department via Reuters hide caption

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St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department via Reuters

Hillary Clinton, seen at a 2017 event in New York, recent appeared at a conference in India and talked about the 2016 campaign, saying that she won areas that were hopeful and Trump spoke to voters' racial and gender intolerance. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens delivers the annual State of the State address on Jan. 8. Responding to a news report that overshadowed the speech, Greitens acknowledged he had been "unfaithful" in his marriage but denied allegations that he blackmailed the woman to stay quiet. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

The Missouri state chapter of the NAACP had issued an advisory of its own in June, urging travelers to "pay special attention while in the state of Missouri and certainly if contemplating spending time in Missouri." h2kyaks/Flickr hide caption

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h2kyaks/Flickr

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens after securing the GOP nomination in August of 2016. Allies of Greitens are using a nonprofit group to advance his legislative agenda. Michael Thomas/AP hide caption

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Michael Thomas/AP

Secretive Nonprofits Back Governors Around The Country

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Kris Ingram, a DJ hired to perform at a prom at The Rustic Barn, looks through debris for his equipment after the event venue in Canton, Texas, sustained major tornado damage on Sunday. Brandon Wade/Reuters hide caption

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Brandon Wade/Reuters

David Cortman of the Alliance Defending Freedom speaks after representing Trinity Lutheran Church before the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Concerned Women for America hosted a rally in support of the Missouri church on the court steps. Lauren Russell/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Russell/NPR

In Church-State Playground Brawl, Justices Lean Toward The Church

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Children play on the playground at the Trinity Lutheran Child Learning Center in Columbia, Mo. Courtesy of Alliance Defending Freedom hide caption

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Courtesy of Alliance Defending Freedom

Playground Case Could Breach Barrier Between Tax Coffers, Religious Schools

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Courts in Kansas City, Mo., can impose a maximum fine of $25 for possession of up to 35 grams of marijuana, after voters embraced a ballot initiative Tuesday. Here, three grams of marijuana is displayed. Oliver Contreras/For The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Oliver Contreras/For The Washington Post via Getty Images