Michelle Obama Michelle Obama

Hillary Clinton (from left), Michelle Obama, Melania Trump, Rosalynn Carter and Laura Bush all have expressed their concern about migrant children being torn from parents at the Mexico border. AP hide caption

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AP

First lady Melania Trump speaks about her "Be Best" initiative in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 7. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

One Month Later, What's Become Of Melania Trump's 'Be Best' Campaign?

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President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama wait to greet Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and his wife, Agnese Landini, for a State Dinner at the White House in Washington in 2016. Netflix says it has reached a deal with the Obamas to produce material for the streaming service. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Japan's first lady Akie Abe, left, and first lady Melania Trump, right, arrive for a news conference at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club on April 18 in Palm Beach, Fla. Mrs. Trump is set to announce some new initiatives next week. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Former President Barack Obama and artist Kehinde Wiley unveil his portrait during a ceremony at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Behind The Obama Portraits: Artists Put Their Own Spin On A Presidential Tradition

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The 2020 election cycle might have already started. The Federal Election Commission shows that 129 people have filed to run for president in the next election. Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR hide caption

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Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Former first lady Michelle Obama waves alongside school children while walking down the school lunchline after getting turkey tacos at Parklawn Elementary School in Alexandria, Va., in January 2012 to promote new nutritional guidelines for school lunches. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

First lady Michelle Obama welcomes community leaders from across the country to celebrate the successes and share best practices to continue the work of the Mayor's Challenge to End Veterans' Homelessness in the East Room of the White House complex in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 14. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Michelle Obama delivers her final remarks as first lady during a Jan. 6 ceremony at the White House honoring the 2017 School Counselor of the Year. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Michelle Obama's Emotional Farewell: 'The Power Of Hope' Has 'Allowed Us To Rise'

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First lady Nancy Reagan sits on the knee of Mr. T, dressed as Santa Claus, and gives him a peck on the head, as he joined her for a preview of the White House Christmas decor in 1983. Ira Schwarz/AP hide caption

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Ira Schwarz/AP

This year's White House Gingerbread House is made with 150 pounds of gingerbread, 100 pounds of bread dough, 20 pounds of gum paste, 20 pounds of icing and 20 pounds of sculpted sugar pieces. It also features both the East and West Wings. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

For The Holidays, The Obamas Open Up The White House One Last Time

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