childhood obesity childhood obesity

Silvester Fullard fixes dinner for his 11-year-old son Tavestsiar. When Tavestsiar first came to live with his dad in 2010, he was closed off, Silvester says; "he didn't want to be around other kids." Charles Mostoller for NPR hide caption

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Charles Mostoller for NPR

To Head Off Trauma's Legacy, Start Young

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An orange showing signs of "citrus greening" this spring in Fort Pierce, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The 'Greening' Of Florida Citrus Means Less Green In Growers' Pockets

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Dr. Robert Zarr, second from right, leads a hike through a park in Washington, D.C. Diana Bowen/National Park Service hide caption

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Diana Bowen/National Park Service

To Make Children Healthier, A Doctor Prescribes A Trip To The Park

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The CDC would be happy with these guys, who were playing in Birmingham, Ala., in July 2013. Teenage boys say basketball is their favorite activity. Mark Almond/AL.COM /Landov hide caption

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Mark Almond/AL.COM /Landov

Most Teens Aren't Active Enough, And It's Not Always Their Fault

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Playing outside can help kids — and their parents — maintain a healthy weight. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Adult Obesity May Have Origins Way Back In Kindergarten

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Students at Lowell High School in Michigan sit down for lunch. Shorter lunch breaks mean that many kids don't get enough time to eat and socialize. Emily Zoladz/Landov hide caption

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Emily Zoladz/Landov

These Days, School Lunch Hours Are More Like 15 Minutes

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Just knowing that someone is obese doesn't mean they would benefit from bariatric surgery, doctors say. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Teenagers put in more than two hours a day of TV time on average, still more than what pediatricians say is healthy. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Small declines in obesity among young kids could help stem bigger problems in the future. Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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Ocean/Corbis

Falling Obesity Rates Among Preschoolers Mark Healthful Trend

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Adam Cole/NPR

Your Child's Fat, Mine's Fine: Rose-Colored Glasses And The Obesity Epidemic

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