immigrants immigrants

Protesters in front of The Red Hen in Lexington, Va. on Tuesday, June 26. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders was asked to leave the Red Hen restaurant by its owner. Norm Shafer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Norm Shafer/Getty Images

For Restaurant Staff, A Rare Chance To Protest The Trump Administration

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624837971/624911889" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Children and workers are seen at a tent encampment on June 19, 2018 in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration is using the tent facility to house immigrant children separated from their parents. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A young girl waits for care in a medical clinic. A growing number of citizen children of immigrant parents are losing out on Medicaid because their parents fear deportation. Jonathan Kirn/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jonathan Kirn/Getty Images

Fearing Deportation, Some Immigrants Opt Out Of Health Benefits For Their Kids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/620711221/622678817" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A 4-year-old Honduran girl carries a doll while walking with her immigrant mother. Both were released Sunday from federal detention in McAllen, Texas. Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images

Separating Kids From Their Parents Can Lead To Long-Term Health Problems

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/621872722/622138041" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Yemeni-American Fathi Alhuthaifi stands with his son Ahmed, 9. His wife has been denied a visa under the Trump administration's travel ban. Deb Amos/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Deb Amos/NPR

A woman walks in Skovparken, an officially designated "ghetto" in the Danish city of Kolding. Sidsel Overgaard for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sidsel Overgaard for NPR

In Denmark's Plan To Rid Country Of 'Ghettos,' Some Immigrants Hear 'Go Home'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/593979013/598386512" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Getty Images/Universal Images Group

What Does It Mean To Be A 'Nation Of Immigrants'?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/589249748/589477470" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Along this road are several businesses in Dalton, Ga., that cater to the town's large Hispanic population. As many as 4,000 DACA recipients live in Dalton, and many work in the carpet industry. Kevin D. Liles for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin D. Liles for NPR

Why Employers In Georgia Are Watching The Immigration Debate Closely

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/585770437/587121747" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Young worshippers at Erez Baptist Church in Duncanville, Texas, gather for a midweek music service. The congregation, less than a year old, consists almost entirely of Hispanic immigrants and their children. Tom Gjelten/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Gjelten/NPR

Some Christian Leaders Say Deportations Would Jeopardize Their Churches

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/585398237/585540651" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A U.S. Border Patrol agent questions a man in Nogales, Ariz., seen through a hole in a metal fence marking the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in 2007. Guillermo Arias/Associated Press hide caption

toggle caption
Guillermo Arias/Associated Press

Plenty of food shops in London have sections catering to American immigrants. The busiest times converge around three American holidays: Independence Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Christine Ro/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Christine Ro/NPR
Geoff Hing and Katie Park/NPR

There's An Immigration Gap In How Latinos Perceive Discrimination

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561876519/562234006" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Donald J. Trump (C) delivers his first address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress as U.S. Vice President Mike Pence (L) and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R) listen on February 28, 2017, in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. Jim Lo Scalzo - Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Lo Scalzo - Pool/Getty Images

Workers' gear hangs inside Lobster Trap's facility in Steuben, Maine. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Maine's Immigrants Boost Workforce Of Whitest, Oldest State In U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/524536237/524936087" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hit-and-run accidents in California decreased by as much as 10 percent after the state passed a law in 2013 granting driver's licenses to unauthorized immigrants, say researchers at Stanford University. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

French clubs like this one have become de facto support groups for African immigrants in Lewiston, Maine. Susan Sharon/MPBN hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Sharon/MPBN

In Maine, A Common Language Connects French Canadians, African Immigrants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521648929/521693442" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An El Salvadoran child is interviewed by a U.S. Border Patrol agent after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico into the U.S. to seek asylum on Apr. 14, 2016, in Roma, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

In Their Search For Asylum, Central Americans Find The U.S. Is Closing Its Doors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/519662321/519954303" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript