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Cubans wait their turn to enter Panama's embassy in Havana to apply for travel visas to Panama last March. The U.S. State Department eliminated a coveted five-year tourist visa for Cubans, dealing a heavy blow to entrepreneurs and Cuban members of divided families who used the visas to see relatives in the U.S. and buy precious supplies for their businesses on the island. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

How The Trump Administration Uses 'Workarounds' To Reshape Legal Immigration

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Ken Cuccinelli, the acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, said Monday at the White House that immigrants legally in the U.S. may no longer be eligible for green cards if they use food stamps, Medicaid and other public benefits. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Immigration Chief: 'Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor Who Can Stand On Their Own 2 Feet'

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Ken Cuccinelli, the acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, speaks during a briefing at the White House on Monday. Trump administration officials announced new rules that aim to deny permanent residency to migrants who may need to use food stamps, Medicaid and other public benefits. Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images

A now-closed Irish pub in Lawrence, Mass., displayed an old "Help Wanted/No Irish Need Apply" — a common sight across the country in the mid-1800s. Jonathan Wiggs/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Wiggs/Boston Globe via Getty Images

With Latest Nativist Rhetoric, Trump Takes America Back To Where It Came From

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A youth in Tijuana, Mexico, stands by the border fence that separates Mexico from the United States, where candles and crosses stand in memory of migrants who have died during their journey toward the U.S. Emilio Espejel/AP hide caption

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Emilio Espejel/AP

Trump Administration Hits Some Immigrants In U.S. Illegally With Fines Up To $500,000

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Javier Dominguez at his home in Dillon, Colo. Dominguez is appealing his deportation orders and has to travel over the mountains to immigration court in Denver for his hearings. Ali Budner/KRCC hide caption

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Ali Budner/KRCC

Navigating The Immigration Court System In The Rural Mountain West

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A mother and her three daughters at the border crossing dividing Juárez, Mexico, and El Paso, Texas, on April 9. The family traveled from Guatemala to reach the U.S. David Peinado/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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David Peinado/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Trump Spokesman Calls Plan To Send Immigrants To 'Sanctuary Cities' An 'Olive Branch'

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Hien Tran, 66, and her dog Lucy at the Thai Xuan Village apartment complex in Houston. Scott Dalton for NPR hide caption

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Scott Dalton for NPR

Decades After Clashing With The Klan, A Thriving Vietnamese Community In Texas

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Families eat dinner at Holy Family Church in El Paso. Immigration officials have been releasing hundreds of asylum-seeking migrants into border communities. Churches and shelters are standing by to help. Mallory Falk/KRWG hide caption

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Mallory Falk/KRWG

Along The Southwest Border, Shelters and Churches Scramble To House Migrant Families

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A man raises his arm in a Nazi salute in response to heckling from leftists at a protest gathering the day after a fatal stabbing by migrant suspects triggered large protests in the city of Chemnitz in eastern Germany. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Marlon Munoz still becomes emotional when he remembers having to tell his wife, Aibi Perez, that she had breast cancer, because no other interpreter was available to share the news. Ryan Collerd for Undark hide caption

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Ryan Collerd for Undark