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At A Special Show, 3 Deaf Musicians Want You To Hear Them Roar

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Students enter the Cass Technical High School in Detroit. Detroit Public Schools Community District Superintendent Nikolai Vitti has ordered drinking water to be shut off at the district's roughly 100 schools. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Rashida Tlaib (shown in 2008) served as a Michigan state legislator for six years. On Tuesday, Democrats picked her to run unopposed for the congressional seat held by former Rep. John Conyers for more than 50 years. Tlaib would be the first Muslim woman in Congress. Al Goldis/AP hide caption

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Al Goldis/AP

A couple sits on Belle Isle while looking at the skyline in Detroit, Michigan, in 2017. The city has been released from state oversight of its finances after several years of scrutiny. Anthony Lanzilote/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Lanzilote/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The idea was conceived as a way to highlight how current anti-immigration sentiment echoes slurs against Irish people who came to America after the potato famine in the 1840s. Dan Margulis hide caption

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Dan Margulis

Norman Lippitt puts his feet up in his Birmingham, Mich., office. Courtesy of Joel Kurth/Bridge Magazine hide caption

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Courtesy of Joel Kurth/Bridge Magazine

Defense Attorney For Police In 'Algiers Motel Shooting': 'Am I A Soulless Person?'

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Detroit resident Teresa Moon, who has lived in the city's 8 Mile Road neighborhood for 59 years, stands in front of what she calls a "segregation wall." Denise Guerra /NPR hide caption

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Denise Guerra /NPR

In Detroit, A Colorful Mural Stands As A Reminder Of The City's 'Segregation Wall'

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A streetcar rides along Woodward Avenue on Friday in Detroit — the city's first in 61 years. The QLine project was led by private businesses and philanthropic organizations in partnership with local, state and the federal government. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Minara Begum (left) and her sister, Rajna Begum, served coconut Mishti (sweets) at the first Bandhu Gardens pop-up at Rose's Fine Food last July. Courtesy of Andrew Miller hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Miller