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A demonstrator peers at a memorial to Akai Gurley at a public housing complex in Brooklyn, N.Y. Gurley was shot and killed by an NYPD officer in November 2014. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Supporters of Akai Gurley's family gather outside the courthouse where former New York City police officer Peter Liang was sentenced for Gurley's shooting death in Brooklyn, N.Y. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

This image taken from a surveillance camera and released by the New York Police Department shows former tennis star James Blake (right) being arrested by plainclothes officer James Frascatore outside the Grand Hyatt New York hotel on Wednesday. AP hide caption

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AP

NYPD veteran Brian Fusco speaks to press outside the 72nd Precinct in the Brooklyn borough on Jan. 20. Fusco is running for president of the state's Patrolman's Benevolent Association in the upcoming election, against incumbent Patrick Lynch, who has been an outspoken critic of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. Mike Segar/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Mike Segar/Reuters/Landov

NYPD's Union Rift Confronted By A Wider Shift In Leadership Style

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New York Mayor Bill de Blasio (center), City Police Commissioner William Bratton (second from right) and other NYPD officers address a news conference on Jan. 5. There is debate surrounding the citywide increase of low-level crime enforcement, otherwise known as the broken windows approach to policing. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

With Baltimore Unrest, More Debate Over 'Broken Windows' Policing

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This undated photo released by the New York City Police Department shows officer Brian Moore. Moore, a New York City police officer, was shot in the head and critically wounded while attempting to stop a man suspected of carrying a gun. AP hide caption

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AP

Multiple lawsuits accuse the New York City Police Department of pressuring officers into fulfilling monthly quotes for tickets and arrests, resulting in warrantless stops. The NYPD denies the allegations. Spencer Platt/Getty hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty

Despite Laws And Lawsuits, Quota-Based Policing Lingers

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Reginald Britt first moved into the Taft Houses, a public housing complex in East Harlem, in 1976 Alexandra Starr hide caption

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Alexandra Starr

Can New York Police Build Trust Among Public Housing Residents?

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New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton attends a press conference after witnessing police being retrained under new guidelines at the Police Academy on Dec. 4. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

NYPD Disciplinary Problems Linked To A 'Failure Of Accountability'

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New York City Police Commissioner Bill Bratton speaks during an NYPD swearing-in ceremony in New York on Jan. 7. He confirmed to NPR today that there had been a work slowdown by officers in the weeks since two police officers were shot dead. He said the matter was being corrected. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

New York Police Commissioner Confirms Work Slowdown By Officers

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