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breast cancer

Mammography detects cancer, but debate rages over when and how often women should get screened. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Sally O'Neill decided to have a double mastectomy rather than "do a wait-and-see." Richard Knox/NPR hide caption

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Richard Knox/NPR

When Treating Abnormal Breast Cells, Sometimes Less Is More

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The Susan Komen for the Cure Foundation is pulling back from some high-profile fundraising walks. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy after genetic testing has prompted a discussion about which other tests should be covered. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Regina and Gabriel Brett talk with Michel Martin about their cancer dilemma

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Peggy Orenstein talks with David Greene on Morning Edition

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In sharing her decision to have a double mastectomy, Angelina Jolie has given voice to a dilemma more women are facing. Carlo Allegri/AP hide caption

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Carlo Allegri/AP

Actress Angelina Jolie at a news conference with Secretary of State John Kerry (in background) and other foreign ministers in London last month. They held a forum on how to reduce sexual violence against women in conflict zones — an issue she has often spoken about. Alastair Grant /PA Photos /Landov hide caption

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Alastair Grant /PA Photos /Landov
Blend Images/Jon Feingersh/Getty Images/iStockphoto.com

Younger Women Have Rising Rate Of Advanced Breast Cancer, Study Says

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Betty Daniel gets a routine yearly mammogram from mammography tech Stella Palmer at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago in 2012. Heather Charles/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Heather Charles/MCT/Landov