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breast cancer

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Surgeon Seeks To Help Women Navigate Breast Cancer Treatment

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The group of women in a new study with the lowest rate of breast cancer consumed about four tablespoons of olive oil each day. Heather Rousseau/NPR hide caption

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Heather Rousseau/NPR

Mediterranean Diet With Extra Olive Oil May Lower Breast Cancer Risk

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Actress Rita Wilson arrives at the premiere of the documentary Fed Up in West Hollywood, Calif., in May 2014. Gus Ruelas/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gus Ruelas/Reuters/Landov
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Screening Tests For Breast Cancer Genes Just Got Cheaper

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The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends mammograms every other year, while the American Cancer Society endorses annual scans. Kari Lehr/Image Zoo/Corbis hide caption

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Kari Lehr/Image Zoo/Corbis

Richard Harris discusses mammogram guidelines

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Catharine Becker of Fullerton, Calif., was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer at 43 despite having a clean mammogram. The mother of three didn't know she had dense breast tissue until after she was diagnosed. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Some researchers recommend starting mammogram screening at age 40, while others say age 50. Some doctors think screening should be based on a woman's overall risk for breast cancer, not just her age. Hero Images/Corbis hide caption

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Hero Images/Corbis

The Hidden Cost Of Mammograms: More Testing And Overtreatment

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