breast cancer breast cancer

Mammography has helped increase the early detection of breast tumors. Now, researchers say, the goal is to discern which of those tumors need aggressive treatment, including chemotherapy or radiation after surgery. Chicago Tribune/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Tribune/Getty Images

Tumor Test Helps Identify Which Breast Cancers Don't Require Extra Treatment

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Women have gotten conflicting advice from doctors about when to have mammograms. Amelie Benoist/Science Source hide caption

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Amelie Benoist/Science Source

OB-GYNs Give Women More Say In When They Have Mammograms

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Jill Wiseman answers questions for the Contact Center based at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service hide caption

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Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service

A new study suggests that some small tumors are small because they are biologically prone to slow growth. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

Some Small Tumors In Breasts May Not Be So Bad After All

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A change in guidelines for breast cancer surgery has resulted in fewer women having to undergo repeat surgeries. Martin J Cook/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin J Cook/Getty Images

Fewer Women Need To Undergo Repeat Surgery After Lumpectomy

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New research finds eating soy milk, edamame and tofu does not have harmful effects for women with breast cancer, as some have worried. In fact, for some breast cancer survivors, soy consumption was found to be tied to longer life. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

For Breast Cancer Survivors, Eating Soy Tied To A Longevity Boost

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Sixty-three percent of women who used the Paxman cooling device said they used wigs or head wraps to cover up hair loss, compared to 100 percent of women who didn't try cooling. Courtesy of Baylor College of Medicine hide caption

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Courtesy of Baylor College of Medicine

Cooling Cap May Limit Chemo Hair Loss In Women With Breast Cancer

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Mammograms are good at finding lumps, but it can be hard to determine which could become life-threatening and which are harmless. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Danish Study Raises More Questions About Mammograms' Message

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Lack of access to quality medical care remains a major factor in higher breast cancer death rates among African-Americans. Deborah Jaffe/Getty Images hide caption

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Deborah Jaffe/Getty Images

Following up a mammogram with an ultrasound exam can find more cancers. But the additional test can also find more false positives that aren't cancer at all. F. Astier/Centre Hospitalier Regional/Science Source hide caption

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F. Astier/Centre Hospitalier Regional/Science Source