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Charlie Hinderliter got a bad case of the flu back in January. He spent 58 days in the hospital, underwent two surgeries and was in a medically induced coma for a week. Neeta Satam for NPR hide caption

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Neeta Satam for NPR

Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot

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Alex Schwartzman, a law student at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., is one of only 8 to 39 percent of college students who get the flu shot in a given year. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Think You Don't Need A Flu Shot? Here Are 5 Reasons To Change Your Mind

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Simone Groper got her flu shot in January at a Walgreens pharmacy in San Francisco. Flu season will likely last a few more weeks, health officials say, and immunization can still minimize your chances of getting seriously sick. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A review of the evidence suggests that alerting people — by text, phone call or other method — when they're due or overdue to get a particular vaccination can boost immunization rates. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

Got Your Flu Shot Yet? Consider This A Reminder

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Luz Barajas took her son Carlos Cholico to get his flu shot at Crawford Kids Clinic in Aurora, Colo., last year. Health officials say there is some evidence the flu shot is more protective than the nasal flu vaccine. Brent Lewis/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Lewis/The Denver Post via Getty Images

The start of flu season is still weeks or months away, but you can get a flu shot now at many pharmacies. "It's a way to get people into the store to buy other things," says Tom Charland, an analyst who tracks the walk-in clinic industry. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Doctors don't always suggest that pregnant women get flu shots, which may account for the relatively low vaccination rates. Jamie Grill/Tetra images RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Grill/Tetra images RF/Getty Images

Which flu vaccine should you get? That may depend on your age and your general health. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Flu Season Brings Stronger Vaccines And Revised Advice

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Joseph Robert gets a flu shot at the Metropolitan Multi-Service Center in Houston during the Falls and Flu Prevention Day, sponsored by the National Council on Aging and Sanofi Pasteur, on Sept. 26, 2013. Aaron M. Sprecher/AP Images for National Council on Aging and Sanofi Pasteur hide caption

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Aaron M. Sprecher/AP Images for National Council on Aging and Sanofi Pasteur

Sonia Despiar, right, a nurse with Gouverneur Healthcare Services, injects Imelda Silva with flu vaccine on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, in New York. At least 10 elderly people and two children in New York have died from the flu and hospitalizations are climbing as the illness hits every county in the state. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Four-year-old Gabriella Diaz gets a flu shot at the Whittier Street Health Center in Boston, Mass., on Wednesday, the same day the city declared a public health emergency. Charles Krupa/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Charles Krupa/ASSOCIATED PRESS

What's in this vial changes from year to year, but the process of creating the flu vaccine remains pretty constant.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Three years ago, drugstores like Walgreens began training pharmacists to give customers vaccines. Since then, tens of thousands of pharmacists have been certified to give shots.

Francis Ying for Kaiser Health News/NPR hide caption

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Francis Ying for Kaiser Health News/NPR

Pharmacies Inject Convenience Into Flu Shot Market

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