sweden sweden

A man gets out of a Volvo 144 to head to a parade in Pyongyang in 2012. In the 1970s, North Korea ordered 1,000 Volvo 144s from Sweden. To this day, the cars have not been paid for. Tanya L. Procyshyn hide caption

toggle caption
Tanya L. Procyshyn

How 1,000 Volvos Ended Up In North Korea — And Made A Diplomatic Difference

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547390622/568255248" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Peter Madsen's privately owned submarine UC3 Nautilus, now a suspected crime scene, gets carried out of Copenhagen harbor on a truck for forensic police investigation earlier this month. Ole Jensen/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ole Jensen/Corbis via Getty Images

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange raises his fist before addressing reporters from the balcony of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London on Friday. In his speech, Assange said there are still plenty of legal battles still to wage: "The proper war is just commencing." Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

Thousands gathered Sunday at the Swedish department store where a 39-year-old Uzbek man is suspect of committing a deadly truck attack. Police say the suspect had been ordered to leave the country and expressed extremist sympathies. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Markus Schreiber/AP

President Trump speaks during his campaign-style rally at Orlando Melbourne International Airport in Florida on Saturday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Trump Says, 'Look What's Happening In Sweden.' Sweden Asks, 'Wait, What?'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516097504/516137861" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Refugees walk around Kladesholmen, Sweden, on Feb. 10. Last year, Sweden received more than 160,000 asylum applications, more than any European country proportionate to its population. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Ramos/Getty Images

As Sweden Absorbs Refugees, Some Warn The Welcome Won't Last

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473261682/473279734" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Forester Jorgen Andersson clears trees with his horse, not a tractor. He says he'd never thought of taking an Afghan refugee as an apprentice — especially one who'd never been in a forest before. But now, he says, "I'm happy to do that." Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

After Fleeing The Taliban, An Afghan Reinvents Himself In Sweden

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472985025/473063760" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Teacher Mohammad Abdualamir and two students. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

A Swedish Town's Newest Residents Settle In And Make A New Start

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472710929/472859146" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A batch of sourdough starter can live indefinitely, but it also requires a certain amount of care and feeding. In Sweden, bakers jetting off for vacation can leave their precious starters in the care of a sitter at the airport. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Asylum seekers from Afghanistan play football Feb. 7 in a resort in Halmstad, Sweden, where they are living temporarily. Sweden took in 163,000 migrants in 2015. Resistance to migrants is beginning to grow among some Swedes. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Ramos/Getty Images

As Migrants Flow In, Sweden Begins To Rethink Its Open-Door Policy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/468589425/469545439" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hans Sick and Freia-Mai Franck have taken in two Afghan teenagers. Franck, who came to Sweden as a German refugee after World War II, says, "I'm remembering what was happening to me when I was a child." Courtesy of Hans Sick and Freia-Mai Franck hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Hans Sick and Freia-Mai Franck

Fleeing Alone, Some Migrant Kids Find Foster Homes In Sweden

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/468608462/469383403" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kent Norman, a retired Swedish engineer, is helping Syrian teenager Mohamed Obai with language study. "They're here now," he says, "so the only thing you can do is to help them." Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

In A Small Swedish Town, Residents Welcome Migrants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467318818/467318819" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's essay "We Should All Be Feminists" has gone out to high schoolers in Sweden. Adichie also wrote the novels Half of a Yellow Sun and Americanah. JB Reed/AP hide caption

toggle caption
JB Reed/AP