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Prosecutor Eva-Marie Persson comments on the court's decision not to detain WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange during a news conference Monday in Uppsala, Sweden. Fredrik Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fredrik Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images

State prosecutor Eva-Marie Persson announced Monday that Sweden is reopening its investigation of Julian Assange over rape allegations from 2010. Jonathan Nackstrand /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand /AFP/Getty Images

The Urban Deli cafe in Stockholm no longer accepts cash for any transactions. Going cashless is a growing trend throughout Sweden that some are beginning to question. Maddy Savage for NPR hide caption

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Maddy Savage for NPR

Sweden's Cashless Experiment: Is It Too Much Too Fast?

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Jean-Claude Arnault is escorted on Nov. 12 after the first day of his appeal trial in Stockholm. Arnault challenged his conviction for rape, but instead of throwing out the conviction, the appeals court extended his sentence. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

Gert Berliner's Swedish ID card with which he eventually entered the U.S. in 1947. He lived in Berlin until he was 14 years old. Gert escaped the Nazi death camps because his parents got him on a children's transport to Sweden in 1939. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR

Jowan Osterlund holds a microchip implant in Stockholm in 2017. His company, Biohax International, is a leading provider of the devices in Sweden. James Brooks/AP hide caption

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James Brooks/AP

Thousands Of Swedes Are Inserting Microchips Under Their Skin

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Sweden Democrats leader Jimmie Åkesson gives a speech in Malmö on Aug. 31. Polls suggest his anti-immigrant party could make a strong showing in Sunday's election. Johan Nilsson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Nilsson/AFP/Getty Images

Ahead Of Elections, A Swedish City Reflects The Country's Ambivalence On Immigration

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A Muslim woman who refused to shake hands on a job interview won her discrimination case in Sweden on Wednesday. suedhang/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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suedhang/Getty Images/Image Source

Burned cars are pictured at Froelunda Square in Gothenburg, Sweden, on Tuesday. Up to 80 cars have been set on fire in western Sweden by masked vandals, police say. Adam Ihse/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Ihse/AFP/Getty Images

Three 17th-century Swedish royal treasures — the crowns of Karl IX and Kristina (upper left and right) and an orb (center) — were stolen on Tuesday in the daring daytime heist. Courtesy of the Swedish police hide caption

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Courtesy of the Swedish police

The South Korean soccer team poses for a photo prior to the 2018 FIFA World Cup match against Sweden at Nizhny Novgorod Stadium on June 18, 2018 in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. Clive Mason/Getty Images hide caption

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Clive Mason/Getty Images

The Science Behind South Korea's Race-Based World Cup Strategy

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A gray wolf in Jamtland County, Sweden. A wealthy landowner in Scotland is hoping to bring wolves from Sweden to the Scottish Highlands to thin the herd of red deer. Gunter Lenz/imageBROKER RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Gunter Lenz/imageBROKER RF/Getty Images

Landowner Aims To Bring Wolves Back To Scotland, Centuries After They Were Wiped Out

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Protesters gathered earlier this month outside Stockholm's Old Stock Exchange building, where the Swedish Academy meets. Demonstrators showed support for resigned Permanent Secretary Sara Danius by wearing her hallmark tied blouse. Fredrik Persson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fredrik Persson/AFP/Getty Images

The Stockholm Stock Exchange Building, which has housed the Royal Swedish Academy since the early 20th century, seen in 2010. "It is a bomb dropped right onto the Stock Exchange Building," a local culture editor said of the allegations and subsequent resignations. "The institution is in ruins." Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

A man gets out of a Volvo 144 to head to a parade in Pyongyang in 2012. In the 1970s, North Korea ordered 1,000 Volvo 144s from Sweden. To this day, the cars have not been paid for. Tanya L. Procyshyn hide caption

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Tanya L. Procyshyn

How 1,000 Volvos Ended Up In North Korea — And Made A Diplomatic Difference

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Peter Madsen's privately owned submarine UC3 Nautilus, now a suspected crime scene, gets carried out of Copenhagen harbor on a truck for forensic police investigation earlier this month. Ole Jensen/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Ole Jensen/Corbis via Getty Images