minimum wage minimum wage

Oakland Kids Get A Raise From The New Minimum Wage

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Diners fill Riverpark, a New York City restaurant, in January. Restaurateurs fear that the tipped-wage hike being proposed in New York will force them to get rid of tipping altogether. Brad Barket/Getty Images hide caption

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Brad Barket/Getty Images

Will A Tipped-Wage Hike Kill Gratuities For New York's Waiters?

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Fast-food workers in Los Angeles march in August 2013 to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Similar protests around the country have been organized by labor unions. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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Nick Ut/AP

Unions Have Pushed The $15 Minimum Wage, But Few Members Will Benefit

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Protesters assemble in front of a McDonald's in Los Angeles, demanding a $15 an hour minimum wage in September. Paul Buck/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Paul Buck/EPA/Landov

Los Angeles Residents Divided Over Proposed $15 Minimum Wage

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Srirupa Dasgupta opened Upohar, a restaurant and catering service, with a social mission. Her employees — primarily refugees — earn double the minimum wage. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

A Restaurant That Serves Up A Side Of Social Goals

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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signs an executive order raising the city's living wage law Tuesday. The move will require some employers to pay their employees between $11.50 and $13.13 an hour, depending on whether the employee receives benefits. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Wetzel's Pretzels employee Emperatriz Orozco hands out free samples at the Westfield Valley Fair Mall. Steve Henn/NPR hide caption

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Steve Henn/NPR

A Mall With Two Minimum Wages

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Darlene Handy of Baltimore holds up a banner at a rally supporting a pay measure in Maryland. More than 20 states have raised minimum pay rates above the federal level. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP