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Nesma (left) and Anys are Algerian siblings who came out to each other at a party. They live in Paris, and both identify as queer. "It now makes us stronger and committed together for the queer and Algerian causes," Anys says. Mikael Chukwuma Owunna hide caption

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Mikael Chukwuma Owunna

A man reads a book on his e-book reader device. In July, Microsoft will be deleting its e-book library and ceasing all e-book sales. Joerg Sarbach/AP hide caption

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Joerg Sarbach/AP

Microsoft Closes The Book On Its E-Library, Erasing All User Content

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Former first lady Michelle Obama's new book Becoming was published in November. Chuck Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Chuck Kennedy/NPR

Tell-Alls, Dramatic Warnings And The Obamas Lead Political Books Of 2018

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Imani Perry, author of Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry Sameer A. Khan hide caption

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Sameer A. Khan

Lorraine Hansberry: Radiant, Radical — And More Than 'Raisin'

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The 'Shadowlands' Of Southeast Asia's Illicit Networks: Meth, Dancing Queens And More

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The white clapboard farmhouse where Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote many of the books in her Little House on the Prairie novels still stands in Mansfield, Mo. Mark Schiefelbein /AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein /AP

In 'Fortress America,' Examining How Fear Crept Into American Life

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