Native American Native American

This June, instructions were posted at an early voting precinct in Bismarck, N.D. In that primary election, tribal IDs that did not show residential addresses were accepted as voter ID. But those same IDs will not be accepted in the general election. James MacPherson/AP hide caption

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James MacPherson/AP

An empty pedestal remains where a statue known as Early Days, which depicted a Native American at the feet of a Catholic missionary and Spanish cowboy, used to stand on Fulton Street in San Francisco. The statue was removed early Friday morning. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Sens. Jon Tester, left, and Steve Daines, speaking together in Jardine, Mont., in August 2017. Both said recently they want the Indian Health Service to have new, strong leadership soon. Matthew Brown/AP Photo/Matthew Brown hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP Photo/Matthew Brown

Gary Nabhan holds white tepary beans grown at his home in Patagonia, Ariz. Nabhan believes that drought-tolerant teparies could become a solution for growing food in a hotter and drier Arizona. Mariana Dale/KJZZ hide caption

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Mariana Dale/KJZZ

Tribal leaders worry that they will be left out of discussions surrounding major decisions affecting tribes and their land, like that of the Navajo Nation which covers parts of Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Jeff Overs/BBC News for Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Overs/BBC News for Getty Images

Blood quantum was initially a system that the federal government placed onto tribes in an effort to limit their citizenship. Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images

So What Exactly Is 'Blood Quantum'?

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Wes Moore speaks at the Robin Hood Veterans Summit at Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum on May 7, 2012 in New York City. Craig Barritt/Getty Images hide caption

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Craig Barritt/Getty Images

At Saint Michael's Association for Special Education in St. Michaels, Ariz., the tap water sometimes runs yellow, brown and black. Sami Rapp/Courtesy of Saint Michael's Association for Special Education hide caption

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Sami Rapp/Courtesy of Saint Michael's Association for Special Education

On The Navajo Nation, Special Ed Students Await Water That Doesn't Stink

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Black-and-white keffiyeh like the one pictured above have long been associated with Yasser Arafat and the Palestinian resistance. This week, fast-fashion Brit emporium Top Shop used similar fabric for a "scarf playsuit." Hazem Bader/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hazem Bader/AFP/Getty Images

The Arrowhead Inn is one of four Whiteclay, Neb., stores that sell 4 million cans of beer annually. The stores are currently up for sale. Jim Kent for NPR hide caption

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Jim Kent for NPR

Pastor Raises Money To Buy Out Liquor Stores Near Reservation

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Vintage Seminole patchwork on display at the home of Patsy West, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Courtesy of Will O'Leary hide caption

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Courtesy of Will O'Leary

Seminole Patchwork: Admiration And Appropriation

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Mary Lynne Bill-Old Coyote, Montana's director of Indian health, says the ACA has helped build the community by providing job opportunities. Montana saw 3 percent growth last year in the number of health care jobs. Courtesy of Thom Bridge/Helena Independent Record hide caption

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Courtesy of Thom Bridge/Helena Independent Record

Obamacare Brought Jobs To Indian Country That Could Vanish With Repeal

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Richie Blink, born and raised in Plaquemines Parish, La., south of New Orleans, works for the National Wildlife Federation. He got in touch with an archaeologist to take a look at some shards of pottery that were eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. Blink holds a pottery shard that could be 300 to 500 years old, from the Plaquemine culture of what's called the Bayou Petre phase. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

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Tegan Wendland/WWNO

Louisiana History Washes Away As Sea Levels Rise, Land Sinks

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Santo Tomas Catholic Church in Abiquiu, N.M., is the site of an annual saint's day celebration in late November that includes cultural elements of the genizaros, the descendants of Native American slaves. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Descendants Of Native American Slaves In New Mexico Emerge From Obscurity

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Navajo students at Crystal Boarding School in New Mexico sing traditional songs in class. Carrie Jung/KJZZ hide caption

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Carrie Jung/KJZZ

Native American Education: What Will It Take To Fix The 'Epitome Of Broken'?

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