Native American Native American

Crow tribal historian Joe Medicine Crow speaks of unity in 2001 at a dedication of a "Peace Memorial," near the site of the Battle of Little Bighorn. Beck Bohrer /AP hide caption

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Beck Bohrer /AP

Solenex's proposed well site is on the land known as the Badger-Two Medicine. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Tribe Says Drilling Project Would Have 'Heartbreaking' Consequences

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Delma and Antonio Salazar have been caring for Delma's mother, Agnes Williams (middle), who has severe memory problems, for the past seven years. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Alzheimer's Disease Underdiagnosed In Indian Country

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Princess Pageant crowns reflect the importance of patchwork, beadwork, and Seminole symbols. Will O'Leary hide caption

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Will O'Leary

A Princess In Patchwork: Sewing For The Miss Florida Seminole Princess Pageant

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The Yocha Dehe tribe grows, mills and markets its own extra-virgin olive oil. The tribe's mill uses top-of-the-line equipment imported from Florence, Italy. Courtesy of Lisa Morehouse hide caption

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Courtesy of Lisa Morehouse

Native American Tribe Bets On Olive Oil

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"Osceola" stands in front of a crowd at the FSU homecoming game. Eileen Soler/Seminole Tribune hide caption

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Eileen Soler/Seminole Tribune

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

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Adidas has pledged to help high school teams that want to change their mascots from Native American imagery. President Obama praised the effort, while the Washington football team shot back, calling the company's move hypocritical. Christof Stache/AP hide caption

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Christof Stache/AP

Outreach coordinator Sonny Weahkee (left) talks with a restaurant customer about health insurance for Native Americans in Shiprock, N.M., in early August. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Spreading The Word: Obamacare Is For Native Americans, Too

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Valerie Davidson, Alaska's health and social services commissioner, drives her 1983 Chevy truck to pick up salmon for a dinner party for 50 people. Annie Fiedt/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Annie Fiedt/Alaska Public Media

Fishing, Cooking And A Yup'ik Upbringing Made Alaska's Health Commissioner

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Last October, a 15-year-old student and member of the Tulalip Tribes in Washington opened fire at his high school with a gun obtained from his father. The tribe had issued a restraining order against the father, but that information didn't show up in the federal criminal database — so he was able to buy the gun. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Crime Program Aims To Close Trust Gap Between Government, Tribes

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