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Cherokee Nation Cultural Biologist Feather Smith-Trevino holds an unripe Georgia Candy Roaster Squash at an educational garden in Tahlequah, Okla., where traditional native plants are grown. Courtesy of the Cherokee Nation Seed Bank hide caption

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Courtesy of the Cherokee Nation Seed Bank

Scientist Corey Gray and his mother, Sharon Yellowfly, are pictured at one of the two massive detectors that make up the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory. One facility, where Gray works, is in Washington state, and the other is in Louisiana. Courtesy of Russell Barber hide caption

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Courtesy of Russell Barber

How A Cosmic Collision Sparked A Native American Translator's Labor Of Love

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Mickey Willenbring tends to one of her Navajo-Churro sheep at Dot Ranch in Scio, Ore. Tim Herrera hide caption

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Tim Herrera

After Combat, A Veteran Finds Solace In Sheep Farming

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Nick Sandmann, a Covington Catholic High School student, stands before Native American activist Nathan Phillips at the Lincoln Memorial in January. An independent report found the students did not instigate the confrontation. Kaya Taitano/Social Media via Reuters hide caption

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Kaya Taitano/Social Media via Reuters

Covington Catholic (Ky.) High School student Nick Sandmann, seen here standing before Native American activist Nathan Phillips at the Lincoln Memorial, says he has received death threats after video of their encounter went viral. Kaya Taitano/Social Media via Reuters hide caption

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Kaya Taitano/Social Media via Reuters

Differing Narratives After Standoff Between Native American Man, High School Student

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'Heartbeat Of Wounded Knee' Demystifies The Modern Native Experience

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With 200-Year Ban Lifted, Distilling Returns To Native American Lands

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Barnie Botone reflects on his 34-year career on the railroad in a StoryCorps interview in Bismarck, N.D., last month. Camila Kerwin/StoryCorps hide caption

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Camila Kerwin/StoryCorps

'The Dark Side Of The Railroad': A Locomotive Engineer's Fraught Legacy With The Rails

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Residential roads with no street name or number signs, such as this one in Belcourt, N.D., are common on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Under recently tightened state rules, voters in North Dakota are required to present identification with a street address, which is a hurdle for Native Americans. Blake Nicholson/AP hide caption

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Blake Nicholson/AP

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., released a DNA analysis to clarify questions about her Native American heritage, something President Trump commonly mocks. Warren is considering a 2020 presidential bid. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Warren Releases DNA Results, Challenges Trump Over Native American Ancestry

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This June, instructions were posted at an early voting precinct in Bismarck, N.D. In that primary election, tribal IDs that did not show residential addresses were accepted as voter ID. But those same IDs will not be accepted in the general election. James MacPherson/AP hide caption

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James MacPherson/AP