slavery slavery

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly listens as President Trump speaks at the White House on Oct. 19. Kevin Dietsch/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Dietsch/Pool/Getty Images

The upstairs porch of Anne Blessing's home in Charleston, S.C., has been a stop on a popular historic home tour. For the first time, visitors will tour the kitchen where enslaved people once spent most of their lives toiling over hot fires. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah McCammon/NPR

Looking 'Beyond The Big House' And Into The Lives Of Slaves

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/550736172/550761731" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

One of Twitty's projects is his "Southern Discomfort Tour" — a journey through the "forgotten little Africa" of the Old South. He picks cotton, chops wood, works in rice fields and cooks for audiences in plantation kitchens while dressed in slave clothing to recreate what his ancestors had to endure. Courtesy of Michael Twitty hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Michael Twitty

Protesters shout anti-Nazi chants after chasing alt-right blogger Jason Kessler from a news conference on Aug. 13 in Charlottesville. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Explaining, Again, The Nazis' True Evil

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544641070/544641071" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Emily Meggett (left) and Isabell Meggett Lucas sit together at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in front of a slave cabin on display that they grew up in. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Kaster/AP

Woman Returns To Her Slave Cabin Childhood Home In The Smithsonian

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523996988/523996989" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michelle Taylor and other participants work to reconstruct slave cabins at Montpelier, the Virginia estate of former President James Madison. Courtesy of Michelle Taylor hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Michelle Taylor

A Researcher Reconnects With Her Ancestors' Slave Past At Madison's Estate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521804754/521823543" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jane Givens searches for her father, Phil, and sister, Biddy, through an ad placed in Cincinnati's The Colored Citizen in 1866. Courtesy of Last Seen hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Last Seen

After Slavery, Searching For Loved Ones In Wanted Ads

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516651689/516695512" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A $35 million project is underway at Monticello to re-create or restore spaces where Thomas Jefferson's slaves worked and lived. ©Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello hide caption

toggle caption
©Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello

Monticello Restoration Project Puts An Increased Focus On Jefferson's Slaves

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516292305/516292310" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Barack Obama speaks during the dedication ceremony for the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC, on Sept. 24, 2016. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Illustration of Dr. J. Marion Sims with Anarcha by Robert Thom. Anarcha was subjected to 30 experimental surgeries. Pearson Museum, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
Pearson Museum, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

Remembering Anarcha, Lucy, and Betsey: The Mothers of Modern Gynecology

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/513764158/554043118" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Alma Mater statue on the Columbia University campus in New York City. The university has released an initial report on its historical ties to slavery in America. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Santo Tomas Catholic Church in Abiquiu, N.M., is the site of an annual saint's day celebration in late November that includes cultural elements of the genizaros, the descendants of Native American slaves. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

Descendants Of Native American Slaves In New Mexico Emerge From Obscurity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505271148/507436740" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Looking out at the Atlantic Ocean from Elmina Castle, I felt the pull of different forebears. Courtesy of Kainaz Amaria hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Kainaz Amaria

Finding A Way Home Through 'The Door Of No Return'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498833757/499343683" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new exhibit at George Washington's Mount Vernon plantation house explores the complexity of the first president's relationship with the slaves he owned that lived and worked there. Tom is the first of the 19 slaves profiled throughout the exhibit, which opened on Oct. 1. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Raquel Zaldivar/NPR