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Princeton Theological Seminary in New Jersey plans to set aside $27 million to provide 30 scholarships for students who descended from slaves or underrepresented groups. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

With Plans To Pay Slavery Reparations, Two Seminaries Prompt A Broader Debate

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David Brion Davis, seen in this undated portrait released by Yale University, died Sunday at the age of 92. The volumes of his seminal trilogy, The Problem of Slavery, won a Pulitzer Prize, a National Book Award and several other prestigious honors. Harold Shapiro/Yale University/AP hide caption

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Harold Shapiro/Yale University/AP

A sample image of "Papa" Renty and his daughter Delia, taken in 1850, are displayed during a press conference announcing a lawsuit against Harvard University on Wednesday in New York City. Kevin Hagen/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Hagen/Getty Images

Article II, Section 26 of Colorado's Constitution has closely mirrored the U.S. Constitution's 13th Amendment, which states in part: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime ... shall exist in the United States ..." P. Solomon Banda/AP hide caption

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P. Solomon Banda/AP

A square near Lisbon's port, where ships once unloaded slaves. Beatriz Gomes Dias and Djass, her anti-racism association, want to erect a memorial to colonial slaves at the site. Jake Cigainero for NPR hide caption

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Jake Cigainero for NPR

Black Portuguese Plan A Memorial To Honor Enslaved Ancestors

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George Mwinnyaa on his visit to the slave castle at Cape Coast in his homeland of Ghana. The door leads to the cells where captives who were resistant were held prior to being sent over the ocean as slaves. Leslie Mwinnyaa hide caption

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Leslie Mwinnyaa

A statue of Edward Colston towers over a square off Colston Avenue in Bristol, England. A small plaque calls Colston "one of the most virtuous and wise sons" of the city. Officials plan to install another plaque explaining his links to the Atlantic slave trade. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

An English City Grapples With The Slave-Trading Past Of Its Most Celebrated Figure

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Detainees stand in a hall at a detention center for migrants in Al Kararim, Libya. The North African country is a key transit spot and destination for migrants seeking employment or a path to Europe. Manu Brabo/AP hide caption

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Manu Brabo/AP

Migrants Captured In Libya Say They End Up Sold As Slaves

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By 1495, Christopher Columbus was in trouble. The riches he had imagined finding in Asia were not materializing in the New World, and the costs of his voyages were mounting. Sending indigenous people back to Europe as slaves became his solution. Heritage Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Heritage Images/Getty Images

An American Secret: The Untold Story Of Native American Enslavement

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White House Chief of Staff John Kelly listens as President Trump speaks at the White House on Oct. 19. Kevin Dietsch/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Pool/Getty Images

The upstairs porch of Anne Blessing's home in Charleston, S.C., has been a stop on a popular historic home tour. For the first time, visitors will tour the kitchen where enslaved people once spent most of their lives toiling over hot fires. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Looking 'Beyond The Big House' And Into The Lives Of Slaves

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