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An African-American Army cook at work in City Point, Va., sometime between 1860 and 1865. Food played a critical role in determining the outcome of the Civil War. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

Underwater archaeology researchers explore the site of the São José slave ship wreck near the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa. Susanna Pershern/Courtesy of U.S. National Parks Service hide caption

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Susanna Pershern/Courtesy of U.S. National Parks Service

The new African Burying Ground Memorial Park was dedicated on Saturday in Portsmouth, N.H. Emily Corwin/NHPR hide caption

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Emily Corwin/NHPR

In New England, Recognizing A Little-Known History Of Slavery

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Whitney Plantation owner John Cummings has commissioned stark artwork for the site, including realistic statues of slave children found throughout the museum. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

New Museum Depicts 'The Life Of A Slave From Cradle To The Tomb'

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Burmese migrant Thazin Mon Htay and her father Ko Ngwe Htay were trafficked to Thailand to peel shrimp. They worked 16-hour shifts, seven days a week, for less than $10 a day, Ko Ngwe told PBS NewsHour. Jason Motlagh/Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for NPR hide caption

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Jason Motlagh/Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for NPR

Great Dismal Swamp, in Virginia and North Carolina, was once thought to be haunted. For generations of escaped slaves, says archaeologist Dan Sayers, the swamp was a haven. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hide caption

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Fleeing To Dismal Swamp, Slaves And Outcasts Found Freedom

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Louis E. Pratt, master ivory cutter for Pratt, Read & Co., shows off eight ivory tusks, April 1, 1955. Courtesy of Deep River Historical Society hide caption

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Courtesy of Deep River Historical Society

Elephant Slaughter, African Slavery And America's Pianos

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A pedestrian walks along Lambeth Road in south London on Friday. Police have rescued three women from a home in the neighborhood. They were held hostage for some 30 years, according to authorities. Andy Rain/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Andy Rain/EPA/Landov

Child laborers wait to be processed at a safe house after being rescued during a raid at a factory in New Delhi by workers from Bachpan Bachao Andolan (Save the Childhood Movement) in June. Kevin Frayer/AP hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/AP

Listen to All Things Considered's Audie Cornish interview study author Kevin Bales.

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Prostitutes arrested in Guatemala City in 2012, as part of an operation against human trafficking. Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images