Hurricanes Hurricanes

"It was a sobering experience. I knew it was bad, but until you see it — I wasn't prepared for it, to be honest with you," Kenny Chesney says. Allister Ann/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Allister Ann/Courtesy of the artist

Kenny Chesney's Love Note To Caribbean After Disaster: It's About The Moving Forward

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/632255136/633686827" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Beryl, the first Atlantic hurricane of the 2018 season, was headed for the Lesser Antilles, where it was expected to make landfall by Monday. National Hurricane Center hide caption

toggle caption
National Hurricane Center

NOAA's GOES satellite shows Hurricane Irma as it moved toward the Florida Coast in the Caribbean Sea on Sept. 07, 2017. Irma was a Category 5 hurricane, and in its aftermath, some people want a Category 6. NOAA /Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NOAA /Getty Images

Some Survivors Of Category 5 Hurricane Irma Want A Category 6

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/620347667/620775274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After Hurricane Harvey hit the Texas coast in August 2017, the storm stalled over Houston and dumped as much as 60 inches of rain on some parts of the region. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Hurricanes Are Moving More Slowly, Which Means More Damage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/616814022/617676373" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A week after Hurricane Harvey swept through southern Texas in August, the streets of Katy, Texas, were still flooded. People in Puerto Rico and the Southeastern U.S. who were affected by the hurricanes are among those who may have extra time to enroll for 2018 health plans. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Satellite imagery of the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 8, as three hurricanes (Katia, Irma, and Jose) are on the move. NASA/J. Stevens/J. Allen hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/J. Stevens/J. Allen

This Year's Hurricane Season Was Intense. Is It A Taste Of The Future?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/568329677/568393504" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The hurricane knocked out power to millions and destroyed water infrastructure. It also tore up plants across the island, washed soil off fields and knocked down fences. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Giusti/AP

Puerto Rico's Hurricane Recovery Hinders Farm Businesses' Seed Research

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567254037/567313633" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Museum curator Teddy Reeves demonstrates a method of salvaging damaged photos at a workshop in Beaumont, Texas. Allison Lee/Houston Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Lee/Houston Public Media

'All Is Not Lost': These Experts Help Save Hurricane-Soaked Heirlooms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/559064274/560615429" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nora Ortiz Navarro, the social worker at Escuela Gaspar Vilá Mayans, leads students in exercises to help them deal with stress and feel calm. Lauren Migaki/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Migaki/NPR

For Puerto Rico's Children, Finding A 'Safe Place' In The Few Schools That Are Open

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/556920578/557094125" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Jose moving west-northwest on Friday. Jose had been a dangerous Category 4 tropical storm, with 150-mph winds, and now it has been declared a hurricane once more. CIRA/CSU and NOAA/NESDIS/RAMMB hide caption

toggle caption
CIRA/CSU and NOAA/NESDIS/RAMMB

People crowd Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport as evacuation is underway on Thursday. Michele Eve Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michele Eve Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images

With A Hurricane Approaching Florida, Airline Algorithms Show No Sympathy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/548853940/549690266" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript