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A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph shows HIV particles (orange) infecting a T cell, one of the white blood cells that play a central role in the immune system. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Bone Marrow Transplant Renders Second Patient Free Of HIV

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Dr. Michelle Salvaggio, medical director of the Infectious Diseases Institute at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, points to drugs used to treat HIV/AIDS. Medical advancements since the epidemic surfaced in the 1980s have helped many of her HIV-positive patients lead healthy lives. Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma

White House Plan To Stop HIV Faces A Tough Road In Oklahoma

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Brittany Williams, a doctoral candidate at the University of Georgia, started taking Truvada when she began dating a man living with HIV. Even though the relationship ended, she continues to take it. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

Larry Dearmon (left) and Stephen Mills pose on their wedding day at Lake Tahoe in 2013. Courtesy of Larry Dearmon hide caption

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Courtesy of Larry Dearmon

A Couple Reflects On A Loss From AIDS That Brought Them Together

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Surgeons at Johns Hopkins perform a transplant using an HIV-positive organ. Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medical hide caption

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Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medical

A memorial honoring victims of the AIDS epidemic sits across the street from the former St. Vincent's Hospital site in New York City, where many of the early victims of AIDS were diagnosed. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Worldwide there are more than 30 million people living with HIV/AIDs. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

How One Pop-Up Restaurant Is Fighting Stigma Against HIV/AIDS

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Nick Vargas talks with Dr. Kathryn Hall at The Source, an LGBT center in Visalia, Calif. Hall says that time and time again, her patients tell her they're afraid to come out to their other doctors. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

'Here It Goes': Coming Out To Your Doctor In Rural America

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