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A view of the Supreme Court from Capitol Hill September 28, 2018. The Court begins its new term on Monday one justice short while the Senate remains stuck in a confirmation fight over Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who's been accused of sexual assault. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Brett Kavanaugh Offers Fiery Defense In Hearing That Was A National Cultural Moment

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh arrives to testify during the second day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearings on Wednesday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., argues with Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee during the third day of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings on Thursday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh thumbs through a well-worn, pocket-sized copy of the U.S. Constitution as he testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the second day of his confirmation hearings Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Protesters dressed as characters from The Handmaid's Tale outside the confirmation hearing for Brett Kavanaugh on Tuesday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Many considered Brett Kavanaugh the front-runner to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy, even before Kennedy announced his retirement. Despite his credentials, Kavanaugh still met resistance within Trump world. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Brett Kavanaugh is sworn in as a federal judge by Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy in 2006. President George W. Bush looks on. Kavanaugh is Trump's pick to replace Kennedy on the Supreme Court. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Brett Kavanaugh (left) speaks in 2006, when he was a nominee for the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. With him is then-Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Abortion rights supporters and opponents protest outside the Supreme Court last year. The issue of abortion will spark millions of dollars in spending on advocacy for and against President Trump's Supreme Court nominee. Zach Gibson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/AFP/Getty Images

A Lifetime Investment: Big Money Pours Into Supreme Court Battle

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The Supreme Court term that just concluded was a small taste of what is to come. In all, 13 of the cases decided by a liberal-conservative split, Justice Anthony Kennedy provided the fifth and deciding conservative vote. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court upheld President Trump's travel ban. The court's majority ruled the ban is "squarely within the scope of Presidential authority under the INA,'" referring to the Immigration and Nationality Act. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Joseph and Maria Caruso vote inside the Early Vote Center in downtown Minneapolis on Oct. 5, 2016. The Supreme Court on Thursday struck down a Minnesota law that prohibited voters from wearing politically themed items inside polling places. Stephen Maturen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Delivers TKO Win On Political Apparel Ban

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People rally outside of the Supreme Court in opposition to Ohio's voter roll purges in January. The court upheld the controversial law Monday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Supreme Court Upholds Controversial Ohio Voter-Purge Law

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Hilary Fung/NPR

Frustrated Supreme Court Looks For A Solution To Partisan Gerrymandering

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Immigrants suspected of being in the U.S. illegally are transferred to be processed at the Tucson sector of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection headquarters in Arizona in 2016. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

A man with a set of maps heads to a federal courthouse in San Antonio last year for a redistricting trial. Texas is one of three states with cases in redistricting before the Supreme Court. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Chief Justice John Roberts stands outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in June, following new Associate Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch investiture ceremony, a ceremony to mark his ascension to the bench. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP