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The State Judicial Building in Montgomery, Ala., is seen in 2003. The state's top court ruled against the parental rights of a lesbian who adopted her partner's children in Georgia, and she's appealing that ruling to the Supreme Court. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Dave Martin/AP

Edgar Orea, right, preaches to a group of same sex marriage supporters that gathered outside the Carl D. Perkins Federal Building in Ashland, Ky., on Thursday. Supporters of jailed County Clerk Kim Davis plan a prayer rally to call for her release. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis (right) will appear in court Thursday to answer a motion to hold her in contempt, after her office again refused to issue marriage licenses at the Rowan County Courthouse in Morehead, Ky. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

Kentucky Marriage License Dispute 'Up To Courts,' Governor Says

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Dr. David Burkons holds the licensing certificates that allowed him to open a clinic that provides medical and surgical abortions. It took about 18 extra months of inspections, he says, to get the approval to offer surgical abortions. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Bucking Trend, Ohio Doctor Opens Clinic That Provides Abortion Services

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The U.S. Supreme Court gave a reprieve to Texas clinics that provide abortion services. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Supreme Court Reprieve Lets 10 Texas Abortion Clinics Stay Open For Now

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Same-sex marriage supporters rejoice outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Friday after the U.S Supreme Court handed down a ruling regarding same-sex marriage. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Supreme Court Declares Same-Sex Marriage Legal In All 50 States

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People gather at a church in Gilbert, Ariz., for an Easter sunrise service in 2010. The town passed a law to regulate signs a church in town was temporarily posting to provide event directions, but the Supreme Court on Thursday declared those rules unconstitutional. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Justices Give Officials More Say On Cars' Plates, Less On Roadside Signs

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