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Frustrated Supreme Court Looks For A Solution To Partisan Gerrymandering

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Immigrants suspected of being in the U.S. illegally are transferred to be processed at the Tucson sector of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection headquarters in Arizona in 2016. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

A man with a set of maps heads to a federal courthouse in San Antonio last year for a redistricting trial. Texas is one of three states with cases in redistricting before the Supreme Court. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Chief Justice John Roberts stands outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in June, following new Associate Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch investiture ceremony, a ceremony to mark his ascension to the bench. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

In this March 10, 2014, photo, Masterpiece Cakeshop owner Jack Phillips decorates a cake inside his store, in Lakewood, Colo. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Supreme Court To Open A Whirlwind Term

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People arrive at John F. Kennedy international airport following an announcement by the Supreme Court that it will take President Donald Trump's travel ban case later in the year on Monday in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Close Family Ties, Job Offers Considered 'Bona Fide' As Trump Travel Ban Takes Effect

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Maria Guadalupe Guereca, 60, visits the grave of her son Sergio Hernandez Guereca at the Jardines del Recuerdo cemetery in Juarez, Mexico, earlier this year. Her son was shot by a U.S. agent across the border in 2010. Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

People walk in front of a Wells Fargo branch on Sept. 9, 2016 in Miami, Fla. On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the city of Miami can sue Wells Fargo and Bank of America under the Fair Housing Act for damages caused by allegedly predatory and discriminatory lending practices. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Supreme Court justices took up a death penalty case on Monday, looking at an inmate's right to help from a mental health expert. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Justices Split Over Defendants' Right To Mental Health Expert Witnesses

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