Civil War Civil War

Karin Bruwelheide handles an amputates limb that dates back to the Civil War. The bones were discovered by scientists at Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia. Scientists at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History have been analyzing the bones to learn more about them and who they may have belonged to. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Civil War Battlefield 'Limb Pit' Reveals Work Of Combat Surgeons

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This image, provided by the Library of Congress, shows the cover of a collection of Confederate songs published in 1861, which includes "Maryland, My Maryland." State lawmakers want to retire it as Maryland's official state song but not erase it. AP hide caption

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AP

Altogether, the Constitution has only been amended 17 times since the Bill of Rights, and one of those amendments (the 21st) was done just to repeal another (the 18th, known as Prohibition). National Archives via AP hide caption

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National Archives via AP

Robert Mueller, special counsel in charge of the DOJ investigation into Russian connections with the Trump campaign, rocked the political world charging three Trump campaign officials this week. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly listens as President Trump speaks at the White House on Oct. 19. Kevin Dietsch/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Pool/Getty Images
Matt Barakat/AP

Virginia School Board Set To Rename J.E.B. Stuart High School

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The upstairs porch of Anne Blessing's home in Charleston, S.C., has been a stop on a popular historic home tour. For the first time, visitors will tour the kitchen where enslaved people once spent most of their lives toiling over hot fires. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Looking 'Beyond The Big House' And Into The Lives Of Slaves

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The Washington National Cathedral decided to remove the Confederate battle flag from its windows last year. Its leaders decided this week to take down stained-glass windows portraying Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. Courtesy of The National Cathedral hide caption

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Courtesy of The National Cathedral

One of Twitty's projects is his "Southern Discomfort Tour" — a journey through the "forgotten little Africa" of the Old South. He picks cotton, chops wood, works in rice fields and cooks for audiences in plantation kitchens while dressed in slave clothing to recreate what his ancestors had to endure. Courtesy of Michael Twitty hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Twitty

Baltimore removed four statues with Confederate ties on Aug. 16 under the cover of darkness, in a five-hour operation ordered by Mayor Catherine Pugh. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Merrit Kennedy/NPR

Baltimore Took Down Confederate Monuments. Now It Has To Decide What To Do With Them

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Crews worked to remove the statue of Supreme Court judge and segregationist Roger Taney from the front lawn of the Maryland State House late Thursday night. Taney wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision that defended slavery and said black Americans could never be citizens. Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Two different variations of Confederate flags fly in Owen Golay's yard in rural Pleasantville, Iowa. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Feeling Kinship With The South, Northerners Let Their Confederate Flags Fly

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President Donald Trump speaks on the Oval Office telephone in January, as a portrait of former President Andrew Jackson hangs in the background. In an interview published Monday, Trump wondered aloud about whether the Civil War would have happened had Jackson been alive in the 1860s. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Annie Johnson and her daughters Fatuma Abdullahi, 14, and Maryan Osman, 15. Fatuma and Maryan were refugees from Somalia's civil war, but found a family and new life with the Johnsons. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Sisters Find Home In Utah After Somali Civil War Made Them Refugees

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