World War II World War II

Eighty-two-year-old Zosia Radzikowska, from Krakow, survived the Holocaust by pretending to be Christian. A retired criminal law professor, Radzikowska is an active member of Krakow's small but flourishing Jewish community. Esme Nicholson for NPR hide caption

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Esme Nicholson for NPR

Auschwitz Remembrance Is Tinged With Tension Over Poland's Holocaust Speech Law

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The Startling Statistics About People's Holocaust Knowledge

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Soviet aviators with their American colleagues in front of a version of the PBY Catalina aircraft in Elizabeth City, N.C. The U.S. trained Soviet pilots to fly the plane as part of Project Zebra, a secret military program during World War II. Courtesy M.G. Crisci hide caption

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Courtesy M.G. Crisci

North Carolina Town Accepts, Then Spurns Russian Gift

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Roy Miller fills cans with cooked collard greens. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

In A New Deal-Era Cannery, Old Meets New

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In 1952, atomic scientists came together on the 10th anniversary of the first controlled nuclear fission chain reaction, which took place Dec. 2, 1942, at the University of Chicago. Courtesy of University of Chicago Photographic Archive hide caption

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Courtesy of University of Chicago Photographic Archive

A blue tent covers a British World War II bomb that was found during construction. Disposal operations are set for Sunday and require what's expected to be Germany's biggest evacuation since the war. Boris Roessler/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Boris Roessler/AFP/Getty Images

In this July 10, 1945, photo provided by U.S. Navy media content operations, USS Indianapolis (CA 35) is shown off the Mare Island Navy Yard, in Northern California, 20 days before it was sunk by Japanese torpedoes. AP hide caption

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AP

Protesters shout anti-Nazi chants after chasing alt-right blogger Jason Kessler from a news conference on Aug. 13 in Charlottesville. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Explaining, Again, The Nazis' True Evil

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Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower's driver, Pearlie Hargrave, and Sgt. Michael McKeogh, his orderly, were married at Versailles during World War II. The Battle of the Bulge broke out the same day, so Eisenhower had to leave the reception early. Courtesy of Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum

Exhibits at Poland's newly opened Museum of the Second World War include photographs, letters and other memorabilia donated by private individuals. Czarek Sokolowski/AP hide caption

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Czarek Sokolowski/AP

Poland's New World War II Museum Just Opened, But Maybe Not For Long

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This 1945 photo provided by the family shows Shizuko Ina, with her son Kiyoshi (left) and daughter Satsuki in an internment camp in Tule Lake, Calif. This photograph was taken by a family friend who was a soldier at the time, since cameras were considered contraband at the camp. Satsuki was born at the camp. Courtesy of the Ina family/AP hide caption

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Courtesy of the Ina family/AP

Many of the Japanese Americans incarcerated at Tule Lake had been farmers before the war. At camp, they were employed as field workers, often for $12 a month. Here, incarcerees work in a carrot field. Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives hide caption

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Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives

Residents leave their houses in Thessaloniki, Greece, on Sunday as part of a mandatory evacuation. It preceded an operation to defuse a World War II bomb discovered there. Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images

On Wednesday, a police officer looks into the hole where an unexploded World War II-era bomb was found during work on a gas station's underground tanks. The city plans a massive evacuation Sunday to defuse and remove the bomb. Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images

Barely a week after assuming office, President Donald Trump set off a worldwide firestorm when he decided to temporarily ban migrants from seven Muslim-majority countries and refugees from all over the world from entering the United States. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Fortress America: What We Can — And Can't — Learn From History

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According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, sweet potato consumption in the United States nearly doubled in just 15 years. U.S. Department Of Agriculture hide caption

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U.S. Department Of Agriculture