World War II World War II

In this July 10, 1945, photo provided by U.S. Navy media content operations, USS Indianapolis (CA 35) is shown off the Mare Island Navy Yard, in Northern California, 20 days before it was sunk by Japanese torpedoes. AP hide caption

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AP

Protesters shout anti-Nazi chants after chasing alt-right blogger Jason Kessler from a news conference on Aug. 13 in Charlottesville. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Explaining, Again, The Nazis' True Evil

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Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower's driver, Pearlie Hargrave, and Sgt. Michael McKeogh, his orderly, were married at Versailles during World War II. The Battle of the Bulge broke out the same day, so Eisenhower had to leave the reception early. Courtesy of Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum

Exhibits at Poland's newly opened Museum of the Second World War include photographs, letters and other memorabilia donated by private individuals. Czarek Sokolowski/AP hide caption

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Czarek Sokolowski/AP

Poland's New World War II Museum Just Opened, But Maybe Not For Long

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This 1945 photo provided by the family shows Shizuko Ina, with her son Kiyoshi (left) and daughter Satsuki in an internment camp in Tule Lake, Calif. This photograph was taken by a family friend who was a soldier at the time, since cameras were considered contraband at the camp. Satsuki was born at the camp. Courtesy of the Ina family/AP hide caption

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Courtesy of the Ina family/AP

Many of the Japanese Americans incarcerated at Tule Lake had been farmers before the war. At camp, they were employed as field workers, often for $12 a month. Here, incarcerees work in a carrot field. Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives hide caption

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Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives

Residents leave their houses in Thessaloniki, Greece, on Sunday as part of a mandatory evacuation. It preceded an operation to defuse a World War II bomb discovered there. Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images

On Wednesday, a police officer looks into the hole where an unexploded World War II-era bomb was found during work on a gas station's underground tanks. The city plans a massive evacuation Sunday to defuse and remove the bomb. Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images

Barely a week after assuming office, President Donald Trump set off a worldwide firestorm when he decided to temporarily ban migrants from seven Muslim-majority countries and refugees from all over the world from entering the United States. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Fortress America: What We Can — And Can't — Learn From History

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According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, sweet potato consumption in the United States nearly doubled in just 15 years. U.S. Department Of Agriculture hide caption

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U.S. Department Of Agriculture

Ignacio Nicolas Campillo, director of a hops production facility in northern Spain, peels apart the flower of the hops plant, to reveal yellow powder inside. The powder is used to make beer. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

No Bitterness Here: Craft Beer Boom Boosts Spain's Hops Growers

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Diver Sammy Lee, the first American to win gold medals in platform diving in consecutive Olympic games, was also among the country's earliest "cultural ambassadors." Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Will Lehner, a Pearl Harbor veteran, attends an honor flight trip in 2010. Glen Moberg/WPR hide caption

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Glen Moberg/WPR

Pearl Harbor Survivor Recounts Sinking Of Japanese Sub Before Aerial Attack

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North Platte Canteen officers pose for a publicity photo, including (left to right) Helen Christ, Mayme Wyman, Jessie Hutchens, Edna Neid, and Opal Smith. Courtesy of the Lincoln County Historical Society hide caption

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Courtesy of the Lincoln County Historical Society

Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga was a high school senior when she entered the Manzanar internment camp. Now 92, she points to the place in Manzanar, near Death Valley in California, where she lived. Lauren Migaki/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Migaki/NPR

At 92, A Japanese-American Reflects On The Lessons Of Internment Camps

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Wednesday marks the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. The history of the attack is clear, yet the conspiracy theory that President Franklin D. Roosevelt allowed the attack to take place to draw America into the war never dies. Express/Getty Images hide caption

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Express/Getty Images

No, FDR Did Not Know The Japanese Were Going To Bomb Pearl Harbor

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The U.S. Air Force Honor Guard carries the remains of World War II pilot Elaine Harmon during services on Wednesday at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

LISTEN: Susan Stamberg on Female WWII Pilots, The Original Fly Girls

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Those who were helped by Portugal's consul general, Aristides de Sousa Mendes, during World War II assemble outside the former Portuguese consulate in Bordeaux. Sousa Mendes issued 10,000 visas to Jews including Stephen Rozenfeld (center front, in blue), George Helft (center front, in white) and Lissy Jarvik (third from right), before being recalled and dismissed from the diplomatic service. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

'Portugal's Schindler' Is Remembered, Decades After His Lifesaving Deeds

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Tuskegee Airman Roscoe Brown poses during the publicity tour for the 2012 movie, Red Tails. The film was based on their experiences during World War II. Carlo Allegri/AP hide caption

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Carlo Allegri/AP

Remembering Tuskegee Airman Roscoe Brown, Educator And Civil Rights Trailblazer

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