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Martin Luther King

The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site in Atlanta is open for the first time in nearly a month, after a grant from the Delta Air Lines Foundation made up for the lack of federal funds from the partial government shutdown. Jeff Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images

Rev. William Barber is co-chair of the Poor People's Campaign: A National Call For Moral Revival. He says this movement is about bringing issues of poverty into the national political discourse. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

The Poor People's Campaign Seeks To Complete Martin Luther King's Final Dream

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The mule train comes into the Washington area against a late afternoon sky in June of 1968. The caravan left Marks, Miss., for the nation's capital on May 13 to participate in the Poor People's Campaign. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

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Bob Daugherty/AP

How A Mule Train From Marks, Miss., Kicked Off MLK's Poor People Campaign

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Coretta Scott King, center, accompanied by the Rev. Ralph Abernathy, her children, and singer Harry Belafonte, leads a march in Memphis to honor her husband who was assassinated four days earlier. AP hide caption

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AP

After MLK's Death, Coretta Scott King Went To Memphis To Finish His Work

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Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking to a mass meeting at the Mason Temple in support of striking sanitation workers. Memphis Press-Scimitar/University of Memphis Libraries Special Collections hide caption

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Memphis Press-Scimitar/University of Memphis Libraries Special Collections

When MLK Was Killed, He Was In Memphis Fighting For Economic Justice

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Tennessee National Guard troopers in jeeps and trucks escort a protest march by striking sanitation workers through downtown Memphis, March 30, 1968. LG/AP hide caption

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LG/AP

Georgia Gilmore adjusts her hat for photographers in 1956 during the bus boycott trial of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Montgomery, Ala. She testified: "When you pay your fare and they count the money, they don't know the Negro money from white money." AP hide caption

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AP

Meet The Fearless Cook Who Secretly Fed — And Funded — The Civil Rights Movement

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Martin Luther King Jr., with his wife, Coretta, at a Harlem hospital after he was stabbed by Izola Ware Curry in 1958. AP hide caption

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AP

Might A Brush With Death Set The Stage For Greatness?

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Historian Peniel Joseph says criticism of the film Selma as historically inaccurate is misguided, and that the movie correctly portrays African-Americans as the drivers of the civil rights movement. Kelvin Ma/Peniel Joseph hide caption

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Kelvin Ma/Peniel Joseph

John Mbugua and his son Giovanni Mbugua, 6, of San Jose, Calif., and Lavon Johnson and his son Mason Johnson, 2, of Fort Meade, Md., greet one another while marching with thousands of other people from Capitol Hill to the Lincoln Memorial on Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Listen: NPR Special Coverage Of The March On Washington Anniversary

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Civil rights leader Martin Luther King waves to supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Aug. 28, 1963, in Washington. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Under Construction: A recent survey of Americans found that fewer than half believe the U.S. has made substantial progress toward racial equality. Here, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., is boxed in by scaffolding as work is done on it. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP