Police Police

Pedestrians walk outside the closed Spruce St. Starbucks store on May 29, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images

When Calling The Po-Po Is A No-No

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When the First Congregational Church of Oakland decided to hang a Black Lives Matter sign, they started a conversation that led them to try to stop calling police, especially on people of color. Sandhya Dirks /KQED hide caption

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Sandhya Dirks /KQED

Oakland Church Steps Out On Faith And Pledges To Stop Calling Police

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LAPD Deputy Chief Dennis Kato tracks crime statistics in near real time and searches across databases using new, more powerful analytics tools. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

How Data Analysis Is Driving Policing

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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that police need a warrant to obtain cellphone location information routinely collected by wireless providers. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

In Major Privacy Win, Supreme Court Rules Police Need Warrant To Track Your Cellphone

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Jose Luis Conde (center) listens to news media while seated between his mother, Rosa Conde, and his attorney Bret Royle at Royle's office in Phoenix on Thursday. Royle released Mesa police body cam videos showing officers punching Conde, who was unarmed, and later mocking him while he was lying on a hospital room floor after his Jan. 28 arrest. Terry Tang/AP hide caption

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Terry Tang/AP

The now infamous incident at a Starbucks in Philadelphia is far from isolated. Experts say it echoes a tragic past that excluded black people from public spaces. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

Nordstrom Rack: "We have three gentlemen..."

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The Supreme Court has ruled previously that police cannot search the private area around a house without a warrant, but the question here was whether the warrant requirement applied to motor vehicles parked within that area. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

In Win For Privacy Rights, Court Says Police Need Warrant To Search Area Around Home

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In recognition of the 50th anniversary of the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and in solidarity with the family and supporters of Stephon Clark and others killed by police, demonstrators protest and march in the Magnificent Mile shopping district on April 2, 2018 in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Chicago Debates If Civilian Groups Should Oversee Police

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A policeman puts up crime scene tape around the scene of a shooting on the east side of Lake Hefner in Oklahoma City, Okla on Thursday. Police say an armed gunman injured three people at a restaurant before being shot dead by two armed civilians outside. Sarah Phipps/The Oklahoman via AP hide caption

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Sarah Phipps/The Oklahoman via AP

Milwaukee Bucks guard Sterling Brown warms up before a basketball game against the Chicago Bulls on Jan. 28 in Chicago. A few days before that game, Milwaukee police used a stun gun on and arrested him over a parking violation. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

NEC Corporation of America already supplies many American jurisdictions with still photo facial recognition. Now the company says it's getting law enforcement inquiries about its real-time facial recognition. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Real-Time Facial Recognition Is Available, But Will U.S. Police Buy It?

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The Metro Nashville Police Department released a photo showing Travis Reinking in the back of a police car moments after being arrested on Monday. Metro Nashville Police Department via AP hide caption

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Metro Nashville Police Department via AP

In this Aug. 25, 2017, image made from video and released by the Asheville, N.C., Police Department, Johnnie Jermaine Rush grimaces after officer Christopher Hickman overpowers Rush in a chokehold. Earlier this year, a shorter clip obtained by a newspaper sparked anger in the community and helped lead to a felony charge of assault by strangulation against former officer Hickman. Asheville Police Department via AP hide caption

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Asheville Police Department via AP

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor speaks at a civics event in January in Seattle. Sotomayor wrote a scathing dissent about police shootings Monday. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Police Shootings Stir Outrage Among Some, But Not The Supreme Court

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Black Lives Matter activists in Sacramento gathered on Friday to protest the death of Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man who was fatally wounded by police. At a vigil for Clark the next day, a woman was hit by a vehicle. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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In this Nov. 24, 2015, file photo, Chicago police officers line up outside the District 1 central headquarters in Chicago, during a protest for the fatal police shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. Paul Beaty/AP hide caption

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Paul Beaty/AP

An elderly man lights a candle during a rally against the murder of Brazilian councilwoman and activist Marielle Franco, in Sao Paulo Brazil on March 15, 2018. Brazilians mourned for the Rio de Janeiro councilwoman and outspoken critic of police brutality who was shot in the city center in an assassination-style killing. Miguel Schincariol /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Schincariol /AFP/Getty Images

On Dec. 21, 2017, Trina Singleton holds a photo of her eldest son Darryl who was murdered in 2016. The Philadelphia Obituary Project, a new website, is working to show that homicide victims in Philadelphia are more than statistics. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

The Philadelphia Obituary Project Chronicles Lives Lost To Violence

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In an effort to curb gun violence, Seattle police are now following up in person on court orders requiring people to surrender guns. Emily Fennick / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Emily Fennick / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

What It Takes To Get Guns Out Of The Wrong Hands

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